UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

☒ Annual Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018

 

or

 

Transition Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

Commission File Number: 333-165972

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   22-3956444
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (IRS Employer
Identification No.)

 

3675 W. Teco Avenue Suite 8 Las Vegas, NV   89118
(Address of principal executive offices)    (Zip Code)

 

(855) 558-8363

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Date File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files) Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☒

 

See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one)

 

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer ☐ Smaller reporting company ☒
  Emerging growth company ☐

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter was $759,960 based upon the price of the registrant’s common stock on June 30, 2018.

 

Documents – Incorporated by Reference: None

 

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, $0.001 par value per share, was 36,018,512 shares as of July 10, 2019.

 

Documents Incorporated by Reference: None

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

Table of Contents

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS 1
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 2
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS 10
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 10
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 10
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 10
     
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 11
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 12
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 13
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 17
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA F-1
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 18
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 18
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 18
     
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 19
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 20
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 22
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 22
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES 23
     
PART IV
     
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 23
  SIGNATURES 25

  

i

 

 

PART I

 

Forward Looking Information

 

This annual report contains statements about future events and expectations that are characterized as “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements are based upon management’s beliefs, assumptions, and expectations. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause our actual results, performance, and financial condition to be materially different from the expectations of future results, performance, and financial condition we express or imply in such forward-looking statements. You are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Except as required by federal securities laws, we disclaim any intent or obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.

 

ITEM 1 - BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

BoxScore Brands, Inc. (formerly U-Vend Inc.) (the “Company”) develops, markets and distributes various self-serve electronic kiosks and mall/airport co-branded islands throughout North America. The Company seeks to place its kiosks in high-traffic host locations such as big box stores, restaurants, malls, airports, casinos, universities, and colleges. Currently, the Company leases, owns and operates its kiosks, and intends in the future to also provide the kiosks, through a distributor relationship, to entrepreneurs wanting to own their own business.

 

The Company has made a strategic shift to enter into the alternative wellness industry and will distribute brands as well as look for opportunities to make acquisitions and develop proprietary brands in the space. The Company will initially focus on brands and products in the cannabidiol (“CBD”) and cannabis space. CBD is extracted from cannabis or hemp. The Company will begin by distributing brands through its wholesale distribution network and will use its existing assets in the vending space as well.

 

Asset Sale

 

On March 18, 2019, the Company approved of an asset sale of certain assets of the legacy MiniMelts business and operation for $350,000 in cash, which was approved by a majority of shareholders. In 2018, MiniMelts sales accounted for approximately $1,100,000 in revenue. Part of the proceeds from the sale will be used to retire certain lease obligations as well as for general operating purposes.

 

The Company will continue to pursue sales of MLB ice cream under the Major League Baseball license and additionally, leverage its vending assets to pursue new revenue streams and test concepts for new offerings at retail.

 

The Board of Directors has agreed to begin to explore the development of certain products in the cannabis industry with a focus on non-THC Cannabinoids in frozen desserts as well as other complimentary CBD product offerings though vending as well as online sales and direct to retail, under a new brand.

 

Technology

 

The Company’s “next-generation” vending kiosks incorporate advanced wireless technology, creative concepts, and ease of management. Its kiosks have been designed to be tech-savvy and can be managed online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, accepting traditional cash payment, as well as credit and debit cards. Host locations and suppliers have been drawn to this distribution concept of product vending based on the advantages of reduced labor and lower product theft as compared to non-kiosk merchandising platforms.

 

The increasing demand for cannabis related products in the health and wellness industry will support utilization and growth of the Company’s technologies at retail.

 

Distribution

 

Currently, the Company distributes a novelty ice cream product, MLB Ice Cream and Nightfood frozen desserts, through a network of 21 automated retail vending kiosks and 87 reach in freezers. On April 25, 2019 the Company signed a distribution agreement with Pellequr, LLC for the distribution and marketing of CBD salves, tinctures, bath products and vape pens.

 

Marketing

 

The Company takes a ‘solutions development’ approach for the marketing of products through a variety of kiosk offerings. This approach has the ability to add digital LCD monitors to most makes and models of their kiosk program. This allows digital advertising on a national and/or local-loop basis, and represents a corresponding additional revenue stream for the Company. The Company is transitioning its product offering into the health and wellness category focused on cannabis and kiosks with monitors will be effective in educating consumers on this new category of products.

 

Licensing

 

The Company entered into a license agreement effective as of January 1, 2016 and continuing through December 31, 2019 with Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. (“MLB”) for the non-exclusive right to certain proprietary intangible property of the MLB to be used in connection with the manufacturing, distribution, promotion and advertisement of an ice cream novelty product to be sold within the U.S., the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. The Company plans to sell pallets of MLB ice cream to large national wholesale distributors as well as through reach-in MLB branded freezers which include a digital advertising screen. The Company received an initial purchase order for pallets of MLB ice cream in May 2018 and shipped this product in June. In November 2017, the Company extended its agreement with MLB initially through calendar year 2018, and subsequently through 2019. Additionally, the Company has a revenue sharing agreement with MLB for on screen advertising at point-of-sale.

 

1

 

 

Other Operational Matters

 

The Company’s marketing activities are conducted through sales representatives. Raw materials used in the Company’s operations are widely available but are purchased from a limited number of sources in order to obtain favorable prices and terms. The Company competes with a large number of significant national self-service electronic kiosk operators and a large number of local manufacturers and distributors. Vending kiosks and related products compete on the basis of design capability, price, quality and ability to meet delivery requirements.

 

Employees

 

As of July 10, 2019, the Company had two full-time employees and one part-time employee and considers its employee relations to be good. None of its employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

 

Websites

 

The Company maintains one active website, www.boxscore.com, which serves as its corporate website and contains information about the Company and its business. The Company owns 12 domain names for future use or for strategic competitive reasons.

 

Corporate Information and Incorporation

 

BoxScore Brands, Inc. was incorporated in March 2007 as a Delaware corporation and we refer to the company as “we”, “us”, the “Company”, “BoxScore Brands” or “BoxScore” in this annual report. In February 2018, we filed an amendment to our certificate of incorporation to change our corporate name from U-Vend Inc. to BoxScore Brands, Inc. to better reflect the nature of our current business operations. We are headquartered in Las Vegas, NV. Our corporate office is located at 3675 W. Teco Avenue, Suite 8, Las Vegas Nevada 89118 and our telephone number is (855) 558-8363. Our corporate website address is www.boxscore.com. Information contained on our websites is not a part of this annual report.

 

Available Information

 

Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), the Company files annual, quarterly and current reports with the SEC. You may read and copy any document we file with the SEC at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information about the public reference room. The SEC maintains a website at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The Company files electronically with the SEC. The SEC makes available, free of charge, through the SEC Internet website, the Company’s filings on Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K, and amendments to those reports, as soon as they are filed with the SEC.

 

ITEM 1A - RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our securities is subject to numerous risks, including the Risk Factors described below. Our business, operating results or financial condition could be materially adversely affected by any of the following risks. The risks described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks we are not presently aware of or that we currently believe are immaterial may also materially affect our business. In such case, we may not be able to proceed with our planned operations and your investment may be lost entirely. The trading price of our common stock could decline due to any of these risks. In assessing these risks, you should also refer to the other information contained or incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements. An investment in our securities should only be acquired by persons who can afford to lose their entire investment without adversely affecting their standard of living or financial security.

 

We have a limited operating history and may not be able to achieve financial or operational success.

 

We were founded in March 2007, initiated our first operating business in October 2009, exited from our first operating business in March 2013, and acquired another operating business in January 2014, which we modified, sold certain operating assets and retained others, and started up our latest business in April 2019. We have a limited operating history with respect to this or any newly acquired business. As a result, we may not be able to achieve sustained financial or operational success, given the risks, uncertainties, expenses, delays and difficulties associated with an early-stage business in an evolving market.

 

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Our growth strategy includes acquisitions that entail significant execution, integration and operational risks.

 

We are pursuing a growth strategy based in part on acquisitions, with the objective of creating a combined company that we believe can achieve increased cost savings and operating efficiencies through economies of scale especially in the integration of administrative services. We will seek to make additional acquisitions in the future to increase our revenue.

 

This growth strategy involves significant risks. There is significant competition for acquisition targets in our markets. Consequently, we may not be able to identify suitable acquisitions or may have difficulty finding attractive businesses for acquisition at reasonable prices. If we are unable to identify future acquisition opportunities, reach agreement with such third parties or obtain the financing necessary to make such acquisitions, we could lose market share to competitors who are able to make such acquisitions. This loss of market share could negatively impact our business, revenues and future growth.

 

Any acquisition we make exposes us to risks.

 

Any acquisition we make carries risks which could result in an adverse effect on our financial condition. These risks include:

 

  diversion of our attention from normal daily operations of our vending business to acquiring and assimilating new businesses;
     
  the use of substantial portions of any cash we have available;
     
  failure to understand the needs and behaviors of users for a newly acquired business or other product;
     
  redundancy or overlap between existing products and services, on the one hand, and acquired products and services, on the other hand;
     
  difficulty assimilating operations, technologies, products and policies of acquired businesses; and
     
  assuming liabilities, including unknown and contingent liabilities, of acquired businesses.

 

If we are unable to develop and market new product offerings or fail to predict or respond to emerging trends, our revenue and any profitability will suffer.

 

Our future success will depend in part on our ability to modify or enhance our product offerings marketed through our vending kiosks to meet user’s demands. If we are unable to predict preferences or industry changes, or if we are unable to modify our product offerings in a timely manner, we may lose revenue. New products may be dependent upon our ability to enter into new relationship with suppliers, which we may not be able to obtain in a timely manner, upon terms acceptable to us, or at all. We spend significant resources developing and enhancing our product offerings. However, new or enhanced product offerings may not be accepted by customers. If we are unable to successfully source and market new product offerings in a timely and cost-effective manner, our revenue and any profitability will suffer.

 

If we fail to develop and diversify product offerings, we could lose market share.

 

The market for selling products through vending kiosks has a low barrier to entry which creates a high level of competition. To remain competitive, we must continue to find, market, and sell new products through our vending kiosks. The time, expense and effort associated with such development may be greater than anticipated, and any products actually introduced by us may not achieve consumer acceptance. Furthermore, our efforts to meet changing customer needs may require the development or licensing of products at great expense. If we are unable to develop and bring to market additional products, we could lose market share to competitors, which could negatively impact our business, revenues and future growth.

 

3

 

 

The increased security risks of online advertising and e-commerce may cause us to incur significant expenses and may negatively impact our credibility and business.

 

A significant prerequisite of online commerce, advertising, and communications is the secure transmission of confidential information over public networks. Concerns over the security of transactions conducted on the Internet, consumer identity theft and user privacy have been significant barriers to growth in consumer use of the Internet, online advertising, and e-commerce. A significant portion of our sales is billed directly to our customers’ credit card accounts. We rely on encryption and authentication technology licensed from third parties to effect secure transmission of confidential information. Encryption technology scrambles information being transmitted through a channel of communication to help ensure that the channel is secure even when the underlying system and network infrastructure may not be secure. Authentication technologies, the simplest example of which is a password, help to ensure that an individual user is who he or she claims to be by “authenticating” or validating the individual’s identity and controlling that individual’s access to resources. Despite our implementation of security measures, however, our computer systems may be potentially susceptible to electronic or physical computer break-ins, viruses and other disruptive harms and security breaches. Advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other developments may specifically compromise our security measures. Any perceived or actual unauthorized disclosure of personally identifiable information regarding website visitors, whether through breach of our network by an unauthorized party, employee theft or misuse, or otherwise, could harm our reputation and brands, substantially impair our ability to attract and retain our customers, or subject us to claims or litigation arising from damages suffered by consumers, and thereby harm our business and operating results. If consumers experience identity theft after using any of our services, we may be exposed to liability, adverse publicity and damage to our reputation. To the extent that identity theft gives rise to reluctance to use our websites or a decline in consumer confidence in financial transactions over the Internet, our businesses could be adversely affected. Alleged or actual breaches of the network of one of our business partners or competitors whom consumers associate with us could also harm our reputation and brands. In addition, we could incur significant costs in complying with the multitude of state, federal and foreign laws regarding the unauthorized disclosure of personal information. For example, California law requires companies that maintain data on California residents to inform individuals of any security breaches that result in their personal information being stolen. Because our success depends on the acceptance of online services and e-commerce, we may incur significant costs to protect against the threat of security breaches or to alleviate problems caused by such breaches. Internet fraud has been increasing over the past few years, and fraudulent online transactions, should they continue to increase in prevalence, could also adversely affect the customer experience and therefore our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

We depend on key management, product management, technical and marketing personnel for continued success.

 

Our success and future growth depend, to a significant degree, on the skills and continued services of our management team, including Michael Flanagan, our President and Chief Executive Officer. Our ongoing success also depends on our ability to identify, hire and retain skilled and qualified technical and marketing personnel in a highly competitive employment market. As we develop and acquire new products and services, we will need to hire additional employees. Our inability to attract and retain well-qualified managerial, technical and sales and marketing personnel may have a negative effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

We may be required to seek additional funding, and such funding may not be available on acceptable terms or at all.

 

We may seek additional funding, however due to a number of factors beyond our expectations or control, including a shortfall in revenue, increased expenses, a need for working capital for growth, increased investment in capital equipment or the acquisition of businesses, services or technologies. The required funding may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to obtain sufficient funding, our business would be harmed. Even if we were able to find outside funding sources, we might be required to issue securities in a transaction that could be highly dilutive to our investors or we may be required to issue securities with greater rights than the securities we have outstanding today. We may also be required to take other actions that could lessen the value of our common stock, including borrowing money on terms that are not favorable to us. If we are unable to generate or raise capital that is sufficient to fund our operations, we may be required to curtail operations, reduce our services, defer or cancel expansion or acquisition plans or cease operations in certain jurisdictions or completely.

 

The termination, non-renewal or renegotiation on materially adverse terms of our contracts or relationships with one or more of our significant host locations, product suppliers and partners could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The success of our business depends in large part on our ability to maintain contractual relationships with our host locations in profitable locations. Our typical host location agreement ranges from one to three years and automatically renews until we or the host retailer gives notice of termination. Certain contract provisions with our host locations vary, including product and service offerings, the commission fees we are committed to pay each host location, and the ability to cancel the contract upon notice after a certain period of time. We strive to provide direct and indirect benefits to our host locations that are superior to, or competitive with, other providers or systems or alternative uses of the floor space that our kiosks occupy. If we are unable to provide our host retailers with adequate benefits, we may be unable to maintain or renew our contractual relationships on acceptable terms, causing our business, financial condition and results of operations to suffer.

 

We depend upon third-party manufacturers, suppliers and service providers for our kiosks.

 

We depend on outside parties to manufacture our kiosks. We intend to continue to expand our installed base of kiosks. Such expansion may be limited by the manufacturing capacity of our third-party manufacturers and suppliers. Third-party manufacturers may not be able to meet our manufacturing needs in a satisfactory and timely manner. If there is an unanticipated increase in demand for our kiosks or our manufacturing needs are not met in a timely and satisfactory manner, we may be unable to meet demand due to manufacturing limitations which could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

4

 

 

In addition, we rely on third-party service providers for substantial support and service efforts that we currently do not provide directly. Any failure by us to maintain our existing support and service relationships or to establish new relationships on a timely basis or on acceptable terms could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Disruptions in our supply chain and other factors affecting the distribution of our products could adversely impact our business.

 

A disruption within our supply chain network could adversely affect our ability to deliver inventory in a timely manner, which could impair our ability to meet customer demand for products and result in lost sales, increased costs or damage to our reputation. Such disruptions may result from damage or destruction to our warehouse facility; weather-related events; natural disasters; third-party strikes, lock-outs, work stoppages or slowdowns; supply or shipping interruptions or costs; or other factors beyond our control. Any such disruption could negatively impact our financial performance or financial condition. We procured all our merchandise of inventory of finished goods ice cream from one vendor during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

If we cannot execute on our strategy and offer new automated retail products and services.

 

Our strategy is based upon leveraging our core competencies in the automated retail space and relationships with certain potential distribution points to provide the consumer with convenience and value and to help retailers drive incremental traffic and revenue. To be competitive, we need to develop, or otherwise provide, new product and service offerings that are accepted by the market and establish third-party relationships necessary to develop and commercialize such product and service offerings. We are exploring new businesses to enter, and new products and services to offer, however, the complexities and structures of these new businesses could create conflicting priorities, constrain limited resources, and negatively impact our core businesses. We may use our financial resources and managements’ time and focus to invest in other companies offering automated retail services, or we may seek to grow businesses organically, or we may seek to offer new products on our current kiosks. We may enter into joint ventures through which we may expand our product offerings. We have significant relationships with certain professional sports organizations which is an important part of our growth strategy. Our dependence on these relationships is critical to our future business success. Should we have problems or lose these relationships we would be at risk. Any new business opportunity also may have its own unique risks related to operations, finances, intellectual property, technology, legal and regulatory issues, corporate governance or other challenges, for which we may have limited or no prior experience. In addition, if we fail to timely establish or maintain relationships with significant retailers and suppliers, we may not be able to provide our consumers with desirable new products and services. Further, in order to develop and commercialize certain new products and services, we will need to create new kiosks or enhance the capabilities of our current kiosks, as well as adapt our related networks and systems through appropriate technological solutions and establish market acceptance of such products or services. We cannot assure you that new products or services that we provide will be successful or profitable.

 

Failure to adequately comply with information security policies or to safeguard against breaches of such policies could adversely affect our operations and could damage our business, reputation, financial position and results of operations.

 

As our business expands to provide new products and services, we are increasing the amount of consumer data that we collect, transfer and retain as part of our business. These activities are subject to laws and regulations, as well as industry standards, in the United States and other jurisdictions in which our products and services are available. These requirements, which often differ materially and sometimes conflict among the many jurisdictions in which we operate, are designed to protect the privacy of consumers’ personal information and to prevent that information from being inappropriately used or disclosed. We maintain and review technical and operational safeguards designed to protect this information and generally require third party vendors and others with whom we work to do so as well. However, despite those safeguards, it is possible that hackers, employees acting contrary to our policies, third-party agents or others could improperly access relevant systems or improperly obtain or disclose data about our consumers, or that we may be determined not to be in compliance with applicable legal requirements and industry standards for data security, such as the Payment Card Industry guidelines. A breach or purported breach of relevant security policies that compromises consumer data or determination of non-compliance with applicable legal requirements or industry standards for data security could expose us to regulatory enforcement actions, card association or other monetary fines or sanctions, or contractual liabilities, limit our ability to provide our products and services, subject us to legal action and related costs and damage our business reputation, financial position, and results of operations.

 

Litigation, arbitration, mediation, regulatory actions, investigations or other legal proceedings could result in material rulings, decisions, settlements, fines, penalties or publicity that could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our industry has in the past been, and may in the future continue to be, party to class actions, regulatory actions, investigations, arbitration, mediation and other legal proceedings. The outcome of such proceedings is often difficult to assess or quantify. Plaintiffs, regulatory bodies or other parties may seek very large or indeterminate amounts of money from us or substantial restrictions on our business activities, and the results, including the magnitude, of lawsuits, actions, settlements, decisions and investigations may remain unknown for substantial periods of time. The cost to defend, settle or otherwise finalize lawsuits, regulatory actions, investigations, arbitrations, mediations or other legal proceedings may be significant and such proceedings may divert management’s time. In addition, there may be adverse publicity associated with any such developments that could decrease consumer acceptance of our products and services. As a result, litigation, arbitration, mediation, regulatory actions or investigations involving us may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

5

 

 

We are subject to substantial federal, state, local and foreign laws and government regulation specific to our business.

 

Our business is subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws and government regulation, including those relating to copyright law, federal and state laws around CBD, access to kiosks in public places, consumer privacy and protection, data protection and information security, taxes, vehicle safety, weights and measures, payment cards and other payment instruments, food and beverages, sweepstakes, and contests. The application of existing laws and regulations, changes in laws or enactment of new laws and regulations, that apply, or may in the future apply, to our current or future products or services, changes in governmental authorities’ interpretation of the application of various government regulations to our business, or the failure or inability to gain and retain required permits and approvals could materially and adversely affect our business. This includes laws surrounding the use of CBD related products.

 

In addition, many jurisdictions require us to obtain certain licenses in connection with the operations of our businesses. There can be no assurance that we will be granted all necessary licenses or permits in the future, that current licenses or permits will be renewed or that regulators will not revoke current licenses or permits. Given the unique nature of our business and new products and services we may develop or acquire in the future, the application of various laws and regulations to our business is uncertain. Further, as governmental and regulatory scrutiny and action with regard to many aspects of our business increase, we expect that our costs of complying with the applicable legal requirements may increase, perhaps substantially.

 

Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could result in, among other things, revocation of required licenses or permits, loss of approved status, termination of contracts, administrative enforcement actions and fines, class action lawsuits, cease and desist orders and civil and criminal liability. The occurrence of one or more of these events, as well as the increased cost of compliance, could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we cannot manage our growth effectively, we could experience a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

As we begin to scale our business we may make errors in predicting and reacting to relevant business trends, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. For example, we may, among other things, over-install kiosks in certain geographic areas leading to non-accretive installations, and we cannot be certain that historical revenue experience for new kiosks will be sustainable in the future.

 

This growth may place significant demands on our operational, financial and administrative infrastructure and our management. As our operations grow in size, scope and complexity, we anticipate the need to integrate, as appropriate, and improve and upgrade our systems and infrastructure, both those relating to providing attractive and efficient consumer products and services and those relating to our administration and internal systems, processes and controls. This integration and expansion of our administration, processes, systems and infrastructure may require us to commit and will continue to cause us to commit, substantial financial, operational and technical resources to managing our business.

 

Managing our growth will require significant expenditures and allocation of valuable management and operational resources. If we fail to achieve the necessary level of efficiency in our organization, including otherwise effectively growing our business lines, our business, operating results and financial condition could be harmed.

 

We may not have the ability to pay interest on our Notes, to repurchase the convertible notes upon a fundamental change or to settle conversions of the Notes, as may be required.

 

If a fundamental change occurs under the indenture governing our Notes, holders of the Notes may require us to repurchase, for cash, all or a portion of their Notes. In addition, upon satisfaction of certain conversion conditions (including conditions outside of our control, such as market price or trading price) and proper conversion of the Notes by a holder, we will be required to make cash payments. Depending on the amount and timing of the payment requirements, we may not have been able to meet all of the obligations relating to Note conversions, which could have had a material adverse effect.

 

Further, if we fail to pay interest on, carry out the fundamental change repurchase obligations relating to, or make payments (including cash) upon conversion of, the Notes, we will be in default under the indenture governing the Notes. A default under the indenture or the fundamental change itself could also lead to a default under agreements governing our existing and future indebtedness. If the repayment of indebtedness were to be accelerated, including after any applicable notice or grace periods, we may not, among other things, have sufficient funds to repay indebtedness or pay interest on, carry out our repurchase obligations relating to, or make cash payments upon conversion of, the Notes.

 

6

 

 

Conversion of our convertible notes into common stock will result in additional dilution to our stockholders.

 

Upon satisfaction of certain conversion conditions (including conditions outside of our control, such as market price or trading price) and proper conversion of the Notes by a holder, we may be required to deliver shares of our common stock to a converting holder. If additional shares of our common stock are issued due to conversion of some or all of the outstanding Notes, the ownership interests of existing stockholders will be diluted. Further, any sales in the public market of any shares of common stock issued upon conversion or hedging or arbitrage trading activity that develops due to the potential conversion of the Notes could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock.

 

Competitive pressures could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The nature and extent of consolidations and bankruptcies, which often occur during or as a result of economic downturns, in markets where we install our kiosks, particularly the supermarket and other retailing industries, could adversely affect our operations, including our competitive position, as the number of installations and potential retail users of our kiosks could be significantly reduced. See the risk factor below entitled, “Events outside of our control, including the current economic environment, has negatively affected, and could continue to negatively affect, consumers’ use of our products and services.”

 

Our business can be adversely affected by severe weather, natural disasters and other events beyond our control, such as earthquakes, fires, power failures, telecommunication loss and terrorist attacks.

 

A catastrophic event that results in the destruction or disruption of any of our critical business or information technology systems could harm our ability to conduct normal business operations and our operating results. While we have taken steps to protect the security of critical business processes and systems and have established certain back-up systems and disaster recovery procedures, any disruptions, whether due to inadequate back-up or disaster recovery planning, failures of information technology systems, interruptions in the communications network, or other factors, could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition, our operational and financial performance is a direct reflection of consumer use of and the ability to operate and service our kiosks used in our business. Severe weather, natural disasters and other events beyond our control can, for extended periods of time, significantly reduce consumer use of our products and services as well as interrupt the ability of our employees and third-party providers to operate and service our kiosks.

 

Our failure to meet consumer expectations with respect to pricing our products and services may adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

Demand for our products and services may be sensitive to pricing changes. We evaluate and update our pricing strategies from time to time and changes we institute may have a significant impact on, among other things, our revenue and net income (loss).

 

We may be unable to attract new host locations, broaden current host relationships, and penetrate new markets and distribution channels.

 

In order to increase our kiosk installations, we need to attract new host locations, broaden relationships with current host locations, and develop operational efficiencies that make it feasible for us to penetrate low density markets and new distribution channels. We may be unable to attract host locations or drive down costs relating to the manufacture, installation or servicing of our kiosks to levels that would enable us to operate profitably in lower density markets or penetrate new distribution channels. If we are unable to do so, our future financial performance could be adversely affected.

 

Payment of increased fees to host locations or other third-party service providers could negatively affect our business results.

 

We face ongoing pricing pressure from our host locations to increase the commission fees we pay to them on our products and services or to make other financial concessions to win or retain their business. If we are unable to respond effectively to ongoing pricing-related pressures, we may fail to win or retain certain accounts. Our fee arrangements are based on our evaluation of unique factors with each host retailer, such as total revenue, long-term, non-cancelable contracts, installation of our kiosks in high-traffic, geographic locations and new product and service commitments. Together with other factors, an increase in service fees paid, or other financial concessions made, to our host retailers could significantly increase our direct operating expenses in future periods and harm our business.

 

7

 

 

Events outside of our control, including the current economic environment, have negatively affected, and could continue to negatively affect, consumers’ use of our products and services.

 

Our consumers’ use of many of our products and services is dependent on discretionary spending, which is affected by, among other things, economic and political conditions, consumer confidence, interest and tax rates, and financial and housing markets. With economic uncertainty still affecting potential consumers, we may be impacted by more conservative purchasing tendencies with fewer non-essential products and services purchased during the coming periods if the current economic environment continues. In addition, because our business relies in part on consumers initially visiting host locations to purchase products and services that are not necessarily our products and services, if consumers are visiting host retailers less frequently and being more careful with their money when they do, these tendencies may also negatively impact our business. Further, our ability to obtain additional funding in the future, if and as needed, through equity issuances or loans, or otherwise meet our current obligations to third parties, could be adversely affected if the economic environment continues to be difficult. In addition, the ability of third parties to honor their obligations to us could be negatively impacted, as host retailers, suppliers and other parties deal with the difficult economic environment. Finally, there may be consequences that will ultimately result from the current economic conditions that are not yet known, and any one or more of these unknown consequences (as well as those currently being experienced) could potentially have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, operating results and liquidity, as well as our business generally.

 

Our future operating results may fluctuate.

 

Our future operating results will depend significantly on our ability to continue to drive new and repeat use of our kiosks, our ability to develop and commercialize new products and services, and our ability to successfully integrate acquisitions and other third-party relationships into our operations. Our operating results could fluctuate and may continue to fluctuate based upon many factors, including:

 

  fluctuations in revenue generated by kiosk businesses and our wholesale distributors;
     
  fluctuations in operating expenses, such as transaction fees and commissions we pay to our host locations;
     
  our ability to establish or maintain effective relationships with significant partners, host locations and suppliers on acceptable terms;
     
  the amount of service fees that we pay to our host locations;
     
  the transaction fees we charge consumers to use our services;
     
  the commercial success of our host locations, which could be affected by such factors as general economic conditions, severe weather or strikes;
     
  the successful use and integration of assets and businesses acquired or invested in;
     
  the level of product or price competition;
     
  the timing and cost of, and our ability to develop and successfully commercialize, new or enhanced products and services;
     
  activities of, and acquisitions or announcements by, competitors; and
     
  the impact from any impairment of inventory, goodwill, fixed assets or intangibles related to our acquisitions and divestitures.

 

Risks Related to our Securities

 

Since our common stock is thinly traded it is more susceptible to extreme rises or declines in price, and you may not be able to sell your shares at or above the price paid.

 

Since our common stock is thinly traded, its trading price is likely to be highly volatile and could be subject to extreme fluctuations in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including:

 

  trading volume of our shares;
     
  number of securities analysts, market-makers and brokers following our common stock;
     
  changes in, or failure to achieve, financial estimates by securities analysts;
     
  new products or services introduced or announced by us or our competitors;
     
  actual or anticipated variations in quarterly operating results;
     
  conditions or trends in our business industries;
     
  announcements by us of significant contracts, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;
     
  additions or departures of key personnel;
     
  sales of our common stock; and
     
  general stock market price and volume fluctuations of publicly-traded, and particularly microcap, companies.

 

8

 

 

The stock markets often experience significant price and volume changes that are not related to the operating performance of individual companies, and because our common stock is thinly traded it is particularly susceptible to such changes. These broad market changes may cause the market price of our common stock to decline regardless of how well we perform as a company. In addition, securities class action litigation has often been initiated following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities. A securities class action suit against us could result in substantial legal fees, potential liabilities and the diversion of management’s attention and resources from our business. Moreover, our shares are currently quoted on the OTC Pink and, further, are subject to the penny stock regulations. Price fluctuations in such shares are particularly volatile and subject to manipulation by market-makers, short-sellers and option traders.

 

Our common stock may be considered “penny stock”, further reducing its liquidity.

 

Our common stock may be considered “penny stock”, which will further reduce the liquidity of our common stock. Our common stock is likely to fall under the definition of “penny stock,” trading in the common stock is limited because broker-dealers are required to provide their customers with disclosure documents prior to allowing them to participate in transactions involving the common stock. These disclosure requirements are burdensome to broker-dealers and may discourage them from allowing their customers to participate in transactions involving our common stock, thereby further reducing the liquidity of our common stock.

 

“Penny stocks” are equity securities with a market price below $5.00 per share other than a security that is registered on a national exchange, included for quotation on the NASDAQ system or whose issuer has net tangible assets of more than $2,000,000 and has been in continuous operation for greater than three years. Issuers who have been in operation for less than three years must have net tangible assets of at least $5,000,000.

 

Rules promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission under Section 15(g) of the Exchange Act require broker-dealers engaging in transactions in penny stocks, to first provide to their customers a series of disclosures and documents including:

 

  A standardized risk disclosure document identifying the risks inherent in investment in penny stocks;
     
  All compensation received by the broker-dealer in connection with the transaction; and
     
  Current quotation prices and other relevant market data; and Monthly account statements reflecting the fair market value of the securities.

 

These rules also require that a broker-dealer obtain financial and other information from a customer, determine that transactions in penny stocks are suitable for such customer and deliver a written statement to such customer setting forth the basis for this determination.

 

Our directors and executive officers will continue to exert significant control over our future direction, which could reduce the sale value of our Company.

 

As of July 10, 2019, our Board of Directors and our executive officers beneficially owned approximately 13% of our common stock. Accordingly, these stockholders, if they act together, will have considerable influence over matters requiring approval of our stockholders, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions. This concentration of ownership, which could result in a continued concentration of representation on our Board of Directors, may delay, prevent or deter a change in control and could deprive our stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common stock as part of a sale of our assets.

 

Investors should not anticipate receiving cash dividends on our common stock, thereby depriving investors of yield on their investment.

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends or distributions on our common stock and intend to retain future earnings, if any, to support our operations and to finance expansion. Therefore, we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on the common stock in the foreseeable future. Such failure to pay a dividend will deprive investors of any yield on their investment in our common stock.

 

Our indemnification of officers and directors and limitations on their liability could limit our recourse against them.

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws contain broad indemnification and liability limiting provisions regarding our officers, directors and employees, including the limitation of liability for certain violations of fiduciary duties. Stockholders therefore will have only limited recourse against these individuals.

 

If we fail to implement and maintain proper and effective internal controls and disclosure controls and procedures, our ability to produce accurate and timely financial statements and public reports could be impaired, which could adversely affect our operating results, our ability to operate our business and investors’ views of us.

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires the Company to evaluate the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting as of the end of each year, and to include a management report assessing the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting in each Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

9

 

 

We have identified our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective and that material weaknesses exists in our internal control over financial reporting. The material weaknesses consist of an insufficient complement of qualified accounting personnel and controls associated with segregation of duties and ineffective controls associated with identifying and accounting for complex and non-routine transactions in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Due to the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures, there may be errors in the Company’s consolidated financial statements and in the accompanying footnote disclosures that could require restatements. Investors may lose confidence in our reported financial information and disclosure, which could negatively impact our stock price.

 

We do not expect that our internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. Over time, controls may become inadequate because changes in conditions or deterioration in the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may occur. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

We have additional common stock and preferred stock available for issuance, which, if issued, could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation authorizes the issuance of up to 600,000,000 shares of our common stock and up to 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock. The common stock and the preferred stock can be issued by the Board of Directors, without stockholder approval. As of July 10, 2019, there were 36,018,512 shares of our common stock outstanding. Further, as of July 10, 2019, there were convertible notes outstanding that can be converted into approximately 88 million shares of our common stock.

 

ITEM 1B - UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2 - PROPERTIES

 

The Company leased approximately 2,800 square feet of office and warehouse space at 1080 N. Batavia Street, Suite A, Orange, California at a rate of $2,830 per month on a one-year lease that expired February 2019. This lease was extended for an additional two months and was terminated on March 31, 2019. In addition, the Company leases an office and warehouse space in Las Vegas, Nevada. The lease for the warehouse in Las Vegas was for a term of 25 months commencing in February 2016 and provided for a base rent of $1,072 with scheduled increases. On March 1, 2018, the Company renewed its lease on the property for a period of twelve months for a base rent of $1,272. In March 2019, the Company renewed the lease for an additional year at the existing monthly base rent of $1,272. The Company’s Las Vegas office now serves as the corporate office and the mailing address is 3675 W. Teco Avenue, Suite 8, Las Vegas, NV 89118.

 

ITEM 3 - LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

There are no material legal proceedings to which the Company or any of its subsidiaries is a party or of which any of their property is the subject.

 

ITEM 4 - MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable

  

10

 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5 - MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

The Company’s common stock has been quoted on a tier of the OTC Markets Group, currently on the OTC Pink and previously on the OTC QB, where it is quoted under the symbol “BOXS”. The Company’s shares were quoted under the symbol UVND until February 28, 2018 when it applied for and was granted a change of symbol from “UVND”. The Company has 600,000,000 shares of common stock authorized.

 

The table below sets forth the range of quarterly high and low closing sales prices for its common stock for 2018 and 2017. The quotations below reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not represent actual transactions:

 

    High     Low  
Year ended December 31, 2018            
First Quarter   $ 0.05     $ 0.01  
Second Quarter   $ 0.07     $ 0.03  
Third Quarter   $ 0.08     $ 0.03  
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.03     $ 0.01  

 

    High     Low  
Year ended December 31, 2017            
First Quarter   $ 0.06     $ 0.03  
Second Quarter   $ 0.05     $ 0.02  
Third Quarter   $ 0.04     $ 0.02  
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.04     $ 0.02  

 

The last reported sales price of BoxScore’s common stock on the OTC Pink on July 10, 2019 was $0.01.

 

Issued and Outstanding Shares

 

The Company’s certificate of incorporation authorizes 600,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001, and 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.001. As of July 10, 2019, the Company had 36,018,512 shares of common stock, and no shares of preferred stock, issued and outstanding.

 

Stockholders

 

As of July 10, 2019, the Company had approximately 983 record holders of its common stock. This number does not include the number of persons whose shares are in nominee or in “street name” accounts through brokers.

 

Dividend Policy

 

The Company did not pay dividends during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. BoxScore has never declared or paid any cash dividends or distributions on our common stock and intend to retain future earnings, if any, to support our operations and to finance expansion. Therefore, it does not anticipate paying any cash dividends on the common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

Stock Transfer Agent and Warrant Agent

 

The Company’s stock transfer agent is Corporate Stock Transfer Inc., 3200 Cherry Creek Drive South, Suite 430, Denver, Colorado 80209. BoxScore acts as its own warrant agent for its outstanding warrants.

 

Recent Issuances of Unregistered Securities

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2018:

 

 

The Company entered into two consulting agreements and issued an aggregate of 350,000 shares of common stock for services to be rendered.

     
  The Company issued 300,000 shares of common stock to a member of the Board of Directors in exchange for his services.

 

11

 

 

The shares of common stock issued in the above transactions have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and were issued and sold in reliance upon the exemption from registration contained in Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated thereunder.

 

Share Repurchased by the Registrant

 

The Company did not purchase or repurchase any of its securities in the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

On July 22, 2011, the Board of Directors of the Company approved the Company’s 2011 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”) and on July 26, 2011, stockholders holding a majority of shares of the Company approved, by written consent, the Plan and the issuance under the Plan of 5,000,000 shares. On November 16, 2017, the Board of Directors approved an increase of 10,000,000 shares to be made available for issuance under the Plan. Accordingly, the total number of shares of common stock available for issuance under the Plan is 15,000,000 shares. Awards may be granted to employees, officers, directors, consultants, agents, advisors and independent contractors of the Company and its related companies. Such options may be designated at the time of grant as either incentive stock options or nonqualified stock options. Stock based compensation includes expense charges related to all stock-based awards. Such awards include options, warrants and stock grants. Generally, the Company issues stock options that vest over three years and expire in 5 to 10 years.

 

The Company records share based payments under the provisions of FASB ASC 718. Stock based compensation expense is recognized over the requisite service period based on the grant date fair value of the awards. The fair value of each option grant is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model on certain assumptions. The Company estimated the expected volatility based on data used by peer group of public companies. The expected term was estimated using the simplified method. The risk-free interest rate assumption was determined using the equivalent U.S. Treasury bonds yield over the expected term. The Company has never paid any cash dividends and does not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Therefore, the Company assumed an expected dividend yield of zero.

 

The following table sets forth information as of December 31, 2018 regarding equity compensation plans under which the equity securities are authorized for issuance.

 

Equity Plan Compensation Information

 

Plan Category   Number of
securities to be
issued upon
exercise of
outstanding
options, warrants
and rights
    Weighted average
exercise price of
outstanding
options, warrants
and rights
    Number of
securities
remaining
available for
future issuance
under equity
compensation
Plans
 
Equity compensation plans approved by securities holders (1)     3,155,100     $ 0.25       11,844,900  
                         
Total     3,155,100               11,844,900  

 

(1) Pursuant to the 2011 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended.

 

ITEM 6 - SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

This item is not applicable to us as a smaller reporting company.

 

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ITEM 7 - MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Certain statements contained herein constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “1995 Reform Act”). BoxScore Brands, Inc. desires to avail itself of certain “safe harbor” provisions of the 1995 Reform Act and is therefore including this special note to enable us to do so. Except for the historical information contained herein, this report contains forward-looking statements (identified by the words “estimate,” “project,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “expect,” “intend,” “believe,” “hope,” “strategy” and similar expressions), which are based on our current expectations and speak only as of the date made. These forward-looking statements are subject to various risks, uncertainties and factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results anticipated in the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, those discussed under Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report, and those described herein that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results anticipated in the forward-looking statements, and the following:

 

  Our limited operating history with our business model;
     
  The low cash balance and limited financing currently available to us. We may in the near future have a number of obligations that we will be unable to meet without generating additional income or raising additional capital;
     
  Further cost reductions or curtailment in future operations due to our low cash balance and negative cash flow;
     
  Our ability to effect a financing transaction to fund our operations which could adversely affect the value of our stock;
     
  Our limited cash resources may not be sufficient to fund continuing losses from operations;
     
  The failure of our products and services to achieve market acceptance; and
     
  The inability to compete in our market, especially against established industry competitors with greater market presence and financial resources.

 

The following discussion and analysis provides information that our management believes is relevant to an assessment and understanding of our results of operations and financial condition, and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and footnotes that appear elsewhere in this report.

 

Overview

 

The Company develops, markets and distributes various self-serve electronic kiosks and mall/airport co-branded islands throughout North America. The Company seeks to place its kiosks in high-traffic host locations such as big box stores, restaurants, malls, airports, casinos, universities, and colleges. Currently, the Company leases, owns and operates its kiosks but intends to also provide the kiosks, through a distributor relationship, to entrepreneurs wanting to own their own business. These kiosks will be a key element of our go-forward strategy with CBD and wellness brands.

 

The Company’s vending kiosks incorporate advanced wireless technology, creative concepts, and ease of management. The Company’s kiosks have been designed to be tech-savvy and can be managed on line 24 hours per day / 7 days a week, accepting traditional cash input as well as credit and debit cards. Host locations and suppliers have been drawn to this distribution concept of product vending based on the advantages of reduced labor and lower product theft as compared to non-kiosk merchandising platforms. The Company takes a solutions development approach for the marketing of products through a variety of kiosk offerings. The Company’s approach to the market includes the addition of digital LCD monitors to most makes and models of their kiosk program. This would allow the Company to offer digital advertising on a national and/or local-loop basis and a corresponding additional revenue stream for the Company.

 

The Company has a depot and staffing to develop and service customers in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Company will experience increased expenses with the growth in sales and number of kiosks in service, both of which increased as the Company executed it business plan.

 

Prior to December 31, 2018, the Company had an active license and sponsorship agreement in place with the National Hockey League. The Company has not produced product to date under the license. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company and NHL agreed to terminate the NHL Agreement. In return, the Company agreed to pay the NHL an amount equal to one percent (1%) of the Company’s net sales of certain products as defined under the agreement.

 

13

 

 

In June 2016, the Company entered into a license agreement beginning January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2018 with Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. (“MLB”, “Licensor”) for the non-exclusive right to certain proprietary intangible property of the Licensor to be used in connection with the manufacturing, distribution, promotion and advertisement of an ice cream novelty product to be sold within the U.S., the District of Columbia and U.S. territories.

 

In 2017, the Company modified its agreement with Major League Baseball Properties to extend through calendar year 2019. Additionally, the Company has a revenue sharing agreement with MLB on screen advertising at Point-of- sale. The Company received an initial purchase order for pallets of MLB ice cream in May 2018 and shipped this product in June. The Company plans to sell pallets of MLB ice cream to large national wholesale distributors as well as through reach-in MLB branded freezers which include a digital advertising screen. We will continue to be in the frozen business and repositioning our offering to health and wellness.

 

Results of Operations

 

For the Year Ended December 31, 2018 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2017

 

Revenue

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company’s revenue decreased by $143,218 or 10% to $1,283,751 compared to revenues of $1,426,969 during the year ended December 31, 2017. The decrease in revenue was due to a revenue product change and due to elimination of lower margin wholesale accounts. As of December 31, 2018, the Company had an installed base of 118 electronic kiosks in Southern California and Las Vegas, Nevada compared to 144 installed units at December 31, 2017.

 

Cost of Goods Sold

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company’s cost of goods sold increased by $207,771 or 27% to $987,580 compared to cost of goods sold of $779,809 during the year ended December 31, 2017 primarily as a result of the inventory write off of $294,82. The Company’s gross margin during the year ended December 31, 2018 was 23%, compared to 45% in 2017 due mainly to the mix of products sold during the respective periods.

 

Selling Expenses

 

Selling expenses for year ended December 31, 2018 decreased by $115,970 or 7% to $1,467,582 compared to $1,583,552 during the year ended December 31, 2017. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company expensed $1,040,863 compared to $1,150,450 in 2017 for sponsorship and media commitment fees in connection with the NHL Corporate Marketing Agreement and Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.

 

General and Administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2018 were $1,525,242, an increase of $243,617 or 19%, compared to $1,281,625 for the year ended December 31, 2017. The increase in general and administrative expenses was mainly due to increase in professional fees .

 

Goodwill Impairment Charge

 

The Company recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $642,340 for the year ended December 31, 2017. There was no such expense during the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Gain on settlement of liability

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company and NHL agreed to terminate the NHL Agreement (see note 11). As a result, the Company recorded a gain on settlement of liability of $2,674,419. There was no gain on settlement of liability during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

Gain on Fair Value of Debt and Warrant Liabilities

 

Certain warrants issued by the Company have a “down round provision”. As such, the warrants have been recorded as liabilities and are subject to remeasurement at each balance sheet date. The warrants are valued using the Black Scholes method and will continue to be adjusted each reporting period for changes in fair value until the warrant is exercised or expires. Gains or losses on revaluation are recorded as a component of other expense on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company recognized a gain on the change in fair value of debt and warrant liabilities in the amount $62,097, as compared to $121,863 during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

14

 

  

Amortization of Debt Discount and Deferred Financing Costs

 

Amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs for the year ended December 31, 2018 were $86,295, compared to $102,207 for the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

Interest Expense

 

Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $661,332, an increase of $355,674 or 116% from the year ended December 31, 2017. The increase was due to higher levels of borrowings in 2018 and default on certain convertible notes.

   

Unrealized Loss on Foreign Currency

 

The Company had two convertible notes, payable in Canadian dollars, that were acquired in connection with the U-Vend Canada merger on January 7, 2014. The Company repaid one of the notes during the year ended December 31, 2016 and refinanced another in a note payable in U.S. Dollars. During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company recorded an unrealized loss of $14,562. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company had no such expense.

 

Gain on sale of asset

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company sold certain equipment and recorded $23,984 in gain on sale of assets, and during the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company had no such asset sale.

 

Net Loss

 

As a result of the foregoing, the net loss for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $683,780 as compared to $3,183,328 incurred during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis. The Company had net loss of $683,780 during the year ended December 31, 2018, has accumulated losses totaling $12,301,991, and has a working capital deficit of $5,928,249 at December 31, 2018. These factors, among others, indicate that the Company may be unable to continue as a going concern. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of these uncertainties.

 

The Company will need to raise additional financing in order to fund the its operations for the next 12 months, and to allow the Company to continue the development of its business plans and satisfy its obligations on a timely basis. Should additional financing not be available, the Company will have to negotiate with its lenders to extend the repayment dates of its indebtedness. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to successfully restructure its debt obligations in the event it fails to obtain additional financing.

 

Operating Activities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we used $1,241,110 of cash in operating activities primarily as a result of our net loss of $683,780, offset by gain on settlement of NHL liability of $2,674,419, gain on sale of asset of $23,984, share-based compensation of $115,186, $211,240 in depreciation expense, $86,801 in amortization expense, $151,361 in amortization of debt discount, loss on default of convertible notes of $120,250, and net changes in operating assets and liabilities of $1,518,332.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, we used $525,151 of cash in operating activities primarily as a result of our net loss of $3,183,328, offset by share-based compensation of $172,059, $180,784 in depreciation expenses, $86,801 in amortization expenses, $(121,863) in change in warrant liabilities, $100,482 in amortization of debt discount, and net changes in operating assets and liabilities of $1,560,604.

 

Investing Activities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, investing activities provided $9,900 in cash, which consisted of proceeds from sale of property and equipment of $23,984, offset by the purchase of fixed assets of $14,084.

 

Net cash used in investing activities during the year ended December 31, 2017, was $64,487, which consisted of the purchase of property and equipment.

 

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Financing Activities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, financing activities provided $1,206,621, including $278,000 in proceeds from warrant exercise, $608,248 in proceeds from promissory notes and $830,250 in proceeds from convertible notes. The Company used $397,299 in repayments of promissory notes, $78,750 in repayments of convertible notes and $33,828 in repayments of capital lease obligations.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, financing activities provided $615,391, including $20,000 in proceeds from warrant exercise, $652,540 in proceeds from convertible notes and $37,300 in proceeds from promissory notes. The Company used $50,000 in repayments of convertible notes and $44,449 in repayment of promissory notes.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

The Company does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have, or are reasonably likely to have, an effect on its financial condition, financial statements, revenues or expenses.

 

Inflation

 

Although the Company’s operations are influenced by general economic conditions, it does not believe that inflation had a material effect on its results of operations during the last two years as it is generally able to pass the increase in material and labor costs to its customers or absorb them as it improves the efficiency of its operations.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2018 describe the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements. Actual results could differ from those estimates and be based on events different from those assumptions. Future events and their effects cannot be predicted with certainty; estimating therefore, requires the exercise of judgment. Thus, accounting estimates change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired or as additional information is obtained. The following critical accounting policies are impacted significantly by judgments, assumptions and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Financial instruments include cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses, derivative liability, warrant liabilities, promissory notes payable, capital lease obligations, convertible notes payables, and senior convertible notes payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for these financial instruments, except for warrant liabilities, convertible notes payable and senior convertible notes payable, since they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are receivable or payable on demand. The convertible notes payable are recorded at face amount, net of any unamortized discounts based on the underlying shares the notes can be converted into. The fair value was estimated using the trading price on December 31, 2018, since the underlying shares are trading in an active, observable market, the fair value measurement qualifies as a Level 1 input. The determination of the fair value of the warrant liabilities and contingent consideration include unobservable inputs and is therefore categorized as a Level 3 measurement.

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) ASC 820 “Fair Value Measurement” establishes a three-tier fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements). These tiers include:

 

  Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets;
     
  Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and
     
  Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions, such as valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

 

16

 

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company does not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market or foreign currency risks. It evaluates certain financial instruments to determine if such instruments contain features that require them to be recorded as liabilities. Certain warrants the Company has issued have a “down round provision.” As a result, the warrants are classified as liabilities.

 

For financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is revalued at each reporting date, with changes in fair value reported in the consolidated statement of operations. The methodology for valuing our outstanding warrants classified as liabilities was determined based on the consideration of the enterprise value of the Company, the limited market of the shares issuable under the agreement and modeling of the Monte Carlo simulation using multiple volatility assumptions. A financial asset or liability’s classification within the hierarchy is determined based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The warrant liability is measured at fair value using certain estimated factors such as volatility and probability which are classified within Level 3 of the valuation hierarchy. Significant unobservable inputs are used in the fair value measurement of the Company’s warrant liabilities include impact of dilution and volatility. Significant increases (decreases) in the volatility input would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

 

Share-Based Payments

 

The Company records its common shares issued based on the value of the shares issued or consideration received, including cash, services rendered or other non-monetary assets, whichever is more readily determinable. The Company accounts for stock-based compensation under the provisions of FASB ASC 718 “Stock Compensation.” This statement requires the Company to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award. That cost is recognized over the period in which the employee is required to provide service in exchange for the award, which is usually the vesting period. In accordance with FASB ASC 505 “Equity”, the measurement date for the non-forfeitable awards to nonemployees that vest immediately is the date the award is issued.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases”, which requires that lease arrangements longer than 12 months result in an entity recognizing an asset and liability. ASU 2016-02 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted. The Company has adopted ASU 2016-02 and determined that its adoption had no impact on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted FASB ASC 606, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers" and all related amendments for all contracts using the modified retrospective method. There was no impact upon the adoption of ASC 606. The Company has determined that the adoption of this standard did not require a cumulative effect adjustment. The comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect for those periods. The Company had 118 and 144 electronic kiosks installed in the southern California and Las Vegas areas from which it generated revenue during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Revenue is recognized at the time each vending transaction occurs, the payment method is approved, and the product is disbursed from the machine. Wholesale revenues, including revenue earned under contracts with major sports organizations, are recognized at the time the products are delivered to the customer based on the agreement with the customer.

 

ITEM 7A - QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable.

  

17

 

 

ITEM 8 - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

 

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

 

December 31, 2018

 

  Page
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2018 and 2017 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 F-6
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 F-7

  

F- 1

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

  

To the Stockholders and the Board of Directors of BoxScore Brands, Inc. (Formerly U-Vend, Inc. and Subsidiaries)

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of BoxScore Brands, Inc. (the Company) (Formerly U-Vend Inc, Inc. and Subsidiaries) as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders' deficit and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the consolidated financial statements (collectively, the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Substantial Doubt About the Company’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company’s has suffered recurring losses from operations since inception and, as of December 31, 2018, has negative working capital and a stockholders’ deficit. This raises substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans in regard to these matters also are described in Note 3. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ( PCAOB ) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ FREED MAXICK CPAs, P.C.

 

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2009.

 

Buffalo, New York

July 10, 2019

 

F- 2

 

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

    December 31,     December 31,  
    2018     2017  
Assets            
Current assets            
Cash   $ 63,078     $ 87,667  
Accounts receivable     25,652       28,572  
Inventory (net)     59,135       81,621  
Prepaid expenses and other assets     18,749       19,674  
Total current assets     166,614       217,534  
Noncurrent assets                
Property and equipment (net)     762,031       594,236  
Security deposits     12,261       11,416  
Intangible asset (net)     -       86,801  
Total assets   $ 940,906     $ 909,987  
                 
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit                
Current Liabilities:                
Accounts payable   $ 691,819     $ 460,719  
Accrued expenses     239,435       88,250  
Accrued interest     749,726       366,327  
NHL and MLB sponsorship liability     -       1,956,204  
Amounts due to officers     267,870       586,851  
Senior convertible notes, net of discount     443,804       443,804  
Promissory notes payable     738,281       464,899  
Convertible notes payable, net of discount     2,745,810       358,046  
Current capital lease obligation     218,118       148,235  
Total current liabilities    

6,094,863

      4,873,335  
                 
Noncurrent liabilities:                
Convertible notes payable, net of discount     1,113,419       2,201,954  
Capital lease obligation     152,668       -  
Derivative liabilities     28,357       -  
Warrant liabilities     129,355       121,860  
Total noncurrent liabilities     1,423,799       2,323,814  
                 
Total Liabilities     7,518,662       7,197,149  
                 
Stockholders’ deficit                
Common stock, $.001 par value, 600,000,000 shares authorized, 32,176,659 and 27,614,992 shares issued and outstanding, respectively     32,177       27,615  
Additional paid in capital     5,692,058       5,303,434  
Accumulated deficit     (12,301,991 )     (11,618,211 )
Total stockholders’ deficit     (6,577,756 )     (6,287,162 )
Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit   $ 940,906     $ 909,987  

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

  

F- 3

 

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

  

    Year Ended     Year Ended  
    December 31,     December 31,  
    2018     2017  
Revenue   $ 1,283,751     $ 1,426,969  
                 
Cost of Goods Sold     987,580       779,809  
                 
Gross Profit     296,171       647,160  
                 
Operating Expenses:                
Selling    

1,467,582

      1,583,552  
General and administrative     1,525,242       1,281,625  
Goodwill impairment charge     -       642,340  
Total operating expenses     2,992,824       3,507,517  
                 
Operating loss     (2,696,653 )     (2,860,387 )
                 
Other Expenses (Income):                
Gain on change in fair value of debt and warrant liabilities     (62,097 )     (121,863 )
Gain on settlement of liability     (2,674,419 )     -  
Gain on sale of asset     (23,984 )     -  
Amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs     86,295       102,207  
Interest expense     661,332       305,657  
Unrealized loss on foreign currency     -       14,562  
Other loss     -       22,408  
Total other expenses (income)     (2,012,873 )     322,971  
                 
Net Loss   $ (683,780 )   $ (3,183,328 )
                 
Net loss per share – basic and diluted   $ (0.02 )   $ (0.12 )
                 
Weighted average common shares – basic and diluted     30,564,688       25,877,458  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

  

F- 4

 

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

 

Consolidated Statements of changes in Stockholders’ Deficit

  

    Common stock     Additional
Paid in
    Accumulated     Total
Stockholders'
 
    Shares     Amount     Capital     Deficit     Deficit  
Balance as of December 31, 2016     24,664,992     $ 24,665     $ 5,111,775     $ (8,434,883 )   $ (3,298,443 )
Stock based compensation     -       -       98,469       -       98,469  
Shares issued for services     2,550,000       2,550       73,590       -       76,140  
Shares issued on warrant exercise     400,000       400       19,600       -       20,000  
Net loss     -       -       -       (3,183,328 )     (3,183,328 )
Balance as of December 31, 2017     27,614,992       27,615       5,303,434       (11,618,211 )     (6,287,162 )
Stock based compensation     -       -       61,639       -       61,639  
Shares issued for services     1,375,000       1,375       52,172       -       53,547  
Shares issued for warrant exercise     3,186,667       3,187       274,813       -       278,000  
Net loss     -       -       -       (683,780 )     (683,780 )
Balance as of December 31, 2018     32,176,659     $ 32,177     $ 5,692,058     $ (12,301,991 )   $ (6,577,756 )

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

  

F- 5

 

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

    Year Ended     Year Ended  
    December 31,     December 31,  
    2018     2017  
Cash Flows from Operating Activities            
Net loss   $ (683,780 )   $ (3,183,328 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:                
Stock based compensation and stock issued for services     115,186       172,059  
Depreciation     211,240       180,784  
Amortization of intangible assets     86,801       86,801  
Amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs     151,361       100,482  
Unrealized loss on foreign currency     -       14,562  
Gain on change in fair value of debt and warrant liabilities     (62,097 )     (121,863 )
Loss on default of convertible notes     120,250     -  
Gain on sale of asset     (23,984 )     -  
Gain on settlement of NHL liability     (2,674,419 )     -  
Settlement of debt interest, fees and penalties with convertible notes     -       22,408  
Goodwill impairment charge     -       642,340  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts receivable     2,920       (12,029 )
Inventory     22,486       (5,409 )
Prepaid expenses and other assets     80       25,469  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses    

273,713

      14,965  
Accrued interest     383,399       189,703  
NHL and MLB sponsorship liability     718,215       1,049,450  
Amount due to officers     117,519       298,455  
Net cash used in operating activities     (1,241,110 )     (525,151 )
                 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:                
Purchases of property and equipment     (14,084 )     (64,487 )
Proceeds from sale of property and equipment     23,984       -  
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities     9,900       (64,487 )
                 
Cash Flows from Financing Activities                
Proceeds from warrant exercise     278,000       20,000  
Proceeds from promissory notes     608,248       37,300  
Proceeds from convertible notes     830,250       652,540  
Repayments of capital lease obligations     (33,828 )     -  
Repayment of convertible note     (78,750 )     (50,000 )
Repayments of promissory notes     (397,299 )     (44,449 )
Net cash provided by financing activities     1,206,621       615,391  
                 
Net increase (decrease) in cash     (24,589 )     25,753  
                 
Cash, beginning of year     87,667       61,914  
                 
Cash, end of year   $ 63,078     $ 87,667  
                 
Supplemental disclosures:                
Interest paid   $ 40,771     $ 67,930  
                 
Supplemental disclosures of non-cash items:                
Debt discount related to warrant liability and beneficial conversion feature   $ 226,508     $ -  
Assets acquired through capital lease   $ 259,459     $ -  
Issuance of common shares in settlement of due to officers   $ -     $ 98,469  
Convertible promissory notes issued in exchange for accrued salary   $ 436,500     $ -

    

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F- 6

 

 

BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.

(Formerly U-Vend Inc.)

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

For the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017

 

Note 1 – Nature of the Business

 

BoxScore Brands, Inc. (formerly U-Vend Inc.) (the “Company”) develops, markets and distributes various self-serve electronic kiosks and mall/airport co-branded islands throughout North America. The Company seeks to place its kiosks in high-traffic host locations such as big box stores, restaurants, malls, airports, casinos, universities, and colleges. Currently, the Company leases, owns and operates its kiosks and intends to also provide the kiosks, through a distributor relationship, to entrepreneurs wanting to own their own business.

 

On February 26, 2018, the Company filed a Certificate of Amendment of the Certificate of Incorporation. The Certificate of Amendment changed the Company’s name to BoxScore Brands, Inc. from U-Vend Inc. to better reflect the nature of the Company’s current business operations, which has expanded to include relationships with major sports organizations dispensing ice cream products through vending machines.

 

The Company’s vending kiosks incorporate advanced wireless technology, creative concepts, and ease of management. They have been designed to be tech-savvy and can be managed online 24 hours day/7 days a week, accepting traditional cash input as well as credit and debit cards. Host locations and suppliers have been drawn to this distribution concept of product vending based on the advantages of reduced labor and lower product theft as compared to non-kiosk merchandising platforms. The Company takes a solutions development approach for the marketing of products through a variety of kiosk offerings. The Company’s approach to the market can include the addition of a digital LCD monitor to most makes and models in a kiosk program. This would allow the Company to offer digital advertising on a national and/or local - loop basis and a corresponding additional revenue stream for the Company.

 

Note 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). The Company’s fiscal year ends on December 31, and its fiscal quarters end on March 31, June 30 and September 30.

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of BoxScore Brands, Inc. and the operations of U-Vend America, Inc., U-Vend Canada, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, U-Vend USA LLC. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates and be based on events different from those assumptions. Future events and their effects cannot be predicted with certainty; estimating, therefore, requires the exercise of judgment. Thus, accounting estimates change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, or as additional information is obtained.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value and cost is determined by the average cost method. Inventory is made up of finished goods ice cream. The Company records an inventory reserves for spoilage and product losses. The reserve for spoilage and product losses was $5,500 as of December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost less depreciation. Depreciation is provided using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the assets. Electronic kiosks, related equipment and delivery vans have estimated useful lives between three and seven years. Expenditures for repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred.

 

F- 7

 

 

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

Goodwill represented the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net assets acquired in a business combination. Acquired intangible assets other than goodwill are amortized over their useful lives unless the lives are determined to be indefinite. For intangible assets acquired in a business combination, the estimated fair values of the assets received are used to establish their recorded values. Valuation approaches consistent with the market approach, income approach and/or cost approach are used to measure fair value.

 

Impairment of Goodwill and Long-lived Assets

 

The Company performs an annual assessment of its goodwill during the fourth quarter of each calendar year or more frequently if indicators of potential impairment exist, such as an adverse change in business climate or a decline in the overall industry demand, that would indicate it is more likely than not that the fair value of its single reporting unit is less than its carrying value. For annual impairment testing in 2017, the Company performed a quantitative analysis and determined the carrying value of its single reporting unit exceeded the fair value. Assessment for possible impairment is based on the Company’s ability to recover the carrying value of the long-lived asset from the expected future pre-tax cash flows. The expected future pre-tax cash flows are estimated based on historical experience, knowledge and market data. Estimates of future cash flows require the Company to make assumptions and to apply judgment, including forecasting future sales, capital investments and expenses and estimating the useful lives of assets. If the expected future cash flows related to the long-lived assets are less than the assets’ carrying value, an impairment charge is recognized for the difference between estimated fair value and carrying value. Based on these factors, the Company determined that the goodwill related to the purchase of U-Vend Canada, Inc. in 2014 was fully impaired and recorded an impairment charge of $642,340 during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and intangible assets subject to amortization are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset group may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by comparing the carrying amount to the estimated future undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated by the asset group. If it is determined that an asset group is not recoverable, an impairment charge is recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset group exceeds its fair value. There was no impairment of long-lived assets for any periods presented.

 

Common Shares Issued and Earnings Per Share

 

Common shares issued are recorded based on the value of the shares issued or consideration received, including cash, services rendered or other non-monetary assets, whichever is more readily determinable. The Company presents basic and diluted earnings per share. Basic earnings per share reflect the actual weighted average of shares issued and outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share are computed including the number of additional shares that would have been outstanding if dilutive potential shares had been issued. In a loss period, the calculation for basic and diluted earnings per share is considered to be the same, as the impact of potential common shares is anti-dilutive.

 

As of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, there were approximately 153.7 million and 113.5 million shares potentially issuable under convertible debt agreements, options, and warrants that could dilute basic earnings per share in the future that were excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per share because their inclusion would have been anti-dilutive to the Company’s losses during the periods presented.

 

Preferred Stock Authorized

 

The Company has authorization for “blank check” preferred stock, which could be issued with voting, liquidation, dividend and other rights superior to common stock. As of December 31, 2018 and 2017, there are 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock authorized, and no shares issued or outstanding.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date The Company estimates and categorizes the fair value of its financial assets by applying the following hierarchy:

 

  Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets;
     
  Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and
     
  Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions, such as valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

 

F- 8

 

 

Financial instruments include cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses, derivative liabilities, warrant liability, promissory notes payable, capital lease obligations, convertible notes payable, and senior convertible notes payable. The senior convertible notes and certain convertible notes payable are recorded at face value net of any unamortized discounts, based upon the value of the warrants issued with the notes. The estimated fair value of the warrant liability includes unobservable inputs and is therefore categorized as a Level 3 measurement. Changes in unobservable inputs may result in significantly higher or lower fair value measurement. The carrying value of the short-term instruments approximates their fair values at December 31, 2018 and 2017 due to their short-term nature.

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company evaluates its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. Certain warrants issued by the Company have a “down round provision” and as a result the warrants are classified as derivative liabilities for accounting purposes. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair market value and then is revalued at each reporting date, with changes in fair value reported in the consolidated statement of operations. The Company does not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market or foreign currency risks.

 

Warrant Liability

 

Certain of the Company’s common stock warrants are subject to down round provision. As such, the warrants have been recorded as a liability and are subject to re-measurement at each balance sheet date, and any change in fair value is recognized as a component of other (income) expense. The warrants are valued using the Black Scholes method. The Company will continue to adjust the liability each reporting period for changes in fair value until the exercise or expiration of the warrants.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation in accordance with accounting guidance that requires all stock-based awards granted to employees and directors to be measured at fair value and recognized as expense. Stock-based compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award, which is generally equivalent to the vesting period. The fair value of each stock option granted is estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The measurement date for the non-forfeitable awards to nonemployees that vest immediately is the date the award is issued.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company has 118 and 144 electronic kiosks installed in the southern California and Las Vegas areas from which it generated revenue during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. Revenue is recognized at the time each vending transaction occurs, the payment method is approved, and the product is disbursed from the machine. Wholesale revenues, including revenue earned under contracts with major sports organizations, are recognized at the time the products are delivered to the customer based on the agreement with the customer.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company has approximately $16.4 million in U.S. federal and state operating loss carryforwards (“NOLs”) available to reduce future taxable income, $15.8 million of which will begin to expire in 2030. Due to the uncertainty as to the Company’s ability to generate sufficient taxable income in the future and utilize the NOLs before they expire, the Company has maintained a full valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets accordingly.

 

Vendor Concentration

 

The Company procured all its inventory of finished goods ice cream which were dispensed through the vending kiosks from one vendor during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

F- 9

 

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain prior period amounts in the accompanying consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to current period presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on the results of operations or cash flows for the periods presented.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted FASB ASC 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” and all related amendments for all contracts using the modified retrospective method. There was no impact upon the adoption of ASC 606. The Company has determined that the adoption of this standard did not require a cumulative effect adjustment. The comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect for those periods. The Company has 118 and 144 electronic kiosks installed in the southern California and Las Vegas areas from which it generated revenue during the nine month periods ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Revenue is recognized at the time each vending transaction occurs, the payment method is approved, and the product is disbursed from the machine. Wholesale revenues, including revenue earned under contracts with major sports organizations, are recognized at the time the products are delivered to the customer based on the agreement with the customer.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, “Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments”, which clarifies the treatment of several types of cash receipts and payments for which there was diversity in practice. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company has evaluated the impact of the adoption of this standard had on the consolidated financial statements and related disclosures and determined the effect was not material.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases”, which requires that lease arrangements longer than 12 months result in an entity recognizing an asset and liability. ASU 2016-02 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted. The Company has adopted ASU 2016-02 and determined that its adoption had no impact on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-11, “Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480) and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): I. Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features; II. Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception, (ASU 2017-11).” Part I of this update addresses the complexity of accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. Down round features are features of certain equity-linked instruments (or embedded features) that result in the strike price being reduced on the basis of the pricing of future equity offerings. Current accounting guidance creates cost and complexity for entities that issue financial instruments (such as warrants and convertible instruments) with down round features that require fair value measurement of the entire instrument or conversion option. Part II of this update addresses the difficulty of navigating Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity , because of the existence of extensive pending content in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. This pending content is the result of the indefinite deferral of accounting requirements about mandatorily redeemable financial instruments of certain nonpublic entities and certain mandatorily redeemable non-controlling interests. The amendments in Part II of this update do not have an accounting effect. This ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of the ASU on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the SEC adopted the final rule under SEC Release No. 33-10532, Disclosure Update and Simplification, amending certain disclosure requirements that were redundant, duplicative, overlapping, outdated or superseded. In addition, the amendments expanded the disclosure requirements on the analysis of stockholders' equity for interim financial statements. Under the amendments, an analysis of changes in each caption of stockholders' equity presented in the balance sheet must be provided in a note or separate statement. The analysis should present a reconciliation of the beginning balance to the ending balance of each period for which a statement of comprehensive income is required to be filed. This final rule is effective on November 5, 2018 and expected to be included in the Form 10-Q for the 3 months ended March 31, 2019. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of the final rule on its consolidated financial statements.

 

Note 3 – Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis. The Company reported net loss of $683,780 for the year ended December 31, 2018, and has incurred accumulated losses totaling $12,301,991 through December 31, 2018. In addition, the Company has incurred negative cash flows from operating activities since its inception. The Company has relied on the proceeds from loans and private sales of its stock, in addition to its revenues, to finance its operations. These factors, among others, indicate that the Company may be unable to continue as a going concern. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of these uncertainties.

 

Until the Company can generate significant cash from operations, its ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon obtaining additional financing. The Company intends to raise additional financing to fund its operations for the next 12 months and allow the Company to continue the development of its business plans and satisfy its obligations on a timely basis. Should additional financing not be available, the Company will have to negotiate with its lenders to extend the repayment dates of its indebtedness. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to successfully restructure its debt obligations in the event it fails to obtain additional financing.

 

F- 10

 

 

Note 4. Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consist of the following as of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017:

 

    December 31,
2018
    December 31,
2017
 
Electronic kiosks and vending machines   $ 1,460,255     $ 1,091,345  
Delivery vans     32,727       21,700  
Less: accumulated depreciation     (730,951 )     (518,809 )
Total   $ 762,031     $ 594,236  

 

Depreciation expense amounted to $211,240 and $180,784, respectively for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017

 

Note 5. Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets consist of the following as of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017:

 

    December 31,
2018
    December 31,
2017
 
Operating agreement   $ 434,000     $ 434,000  
Less: accumulated amortization     (434,000 )     (347,199 )
Total   $ -     $ 86,801  

 

Amortization expense amounted to $86,801, for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Note 6. Debt

 

Senior Convertible Notes

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, a Senior Convertible Note in the aggregate principal amount of $310,000 and a maturity date of December 31, 2017 payable to Cobrador Multi-Strategy Partners, LP (“Cobrador 1”), a related party, was extended until December 31, 2019. The Company also extended the expiration dates of Series A Warrants issued in connection with Cobrador 1 by one year. The fair value of the Series A Warrants did not materially change due to the extension. Cobrador, an entity controlled by the Company’s former CEO, is a related party.

 

On June 30, 2016, the Company issued an additional Senior Convertible Note in the face amount of $108,804 to Cobrador (“Cobrador 2”) in settlement of previously accrued interest, additional interest, fees and penalties. The additional interest, fees and penalties was $72,734 and this amount was charged to operations as debt discount amortization during the year ended December 31, 2016. The Senior Convertible Note was extended during the year ended December 31, 2017 and is due on December 31, 2018. It is convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price $.05 per share and bears interest at 7% per annum. The Company determined that Cobrador 2 had a beneficial conversion feature based on the difference between the conversion price and the market price on the date of issuance and allocated $87,043 as debt discount representing the beneficial conversion feature which was fully amortized at December 31, 2017.

 

During December 2017, the Company issued a Senior Convertible Note in the amount of $25,000 to Cobrador. The note bears interest at 7%, is due in December 2019, and is convertible into common shares at a conversion price of $0.05 per share. In addition, in conjunction with this note, the Company issued 500,000 warrants to purchase common shares at $0.05 with a contractual term of 5 years. The estimated value of the warrants was determined to be $1,421 and was recorded as interest expense during 2017 and a warrant liability due to the down round provision in the note agreement.

 

At December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Cobrador notes had a carrying value of $443,804 and $443,804.

F- 11

 

 

Promissory Notes Payable

 

During 2014, the Company issued an unsecured promissory note to a former employee of U-Vend Canada. The original amount of this note was $10,512 has a term of 3 years and accrues interest at 17% per annum. The total principal outstanding on this promissory note at December 31, 2018 and 2017 was $6,235.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company borrowed $143,908 and $36,400, respectively, pursuant to a series of promissory notes from the same lender. All of the notes bear interest at a rate of 19% per annum, and are payable together with interest over a period of six (6) months from the date of borrowing. The Company repaid $125,931 and $44,449 during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and the balance outstanding on these notes at December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, was $34,044 and $16,067, respectively.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company issued two unsecured promissory notes and borrowed an aggregate amount of $80,000. The promissory notes bear interest at 10% per annum, with a provision for an increase in the interest rate upon an event of default as defined therein and were due at various due dates in May and September 2017. The due dates of both notes were extended to December 31, 2018. As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the balance outstanding on these notes was $80,000.

 

In December 2017, the Company issued promissory notes in the aggregate principal balance of $28,000 to Cobrador, a related party. The notes accrue interest at 7% and have a two-year term. As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the balance outstanding on these notes was $28,000.

 

On November 8, 2017, the Company issued a convertible promissory note (the “Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with net proceeds of $47,000. The Note bears interest at the rate of 12% per annum, has a nine-month maturity, and includes prepayment interest fees increasing based on the prepayment date from 15-40% of the principal amount if the Note is repaid prior to 181 days following the issuance date. There is no right to prepay the Note after the 180th day of issuance. The Note becomes convertible 180 days following the issuance date and the conversion price for the Note is equal to a 39% discount to the average of the two lowest closing bid prices of the Company’s common stock during the 15-trading day period prior to conversion. Conversion of the Note is restricted in the event the number of shares of common stock beneficially held by the note holder and its affiliates in the aggregate after such conversion exceeds 4.99% of the then outstanding shares of common stock. As of December 31, 2017, the note had a carrying value of approximately $47,000, net of discount of $17,164. The Company repaid the note in full for $64,164 including principal and interest in February 2018.

 

On July 18, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note in the principal amount of $187,500 with net proceeds of $147,000. The Company agreed to pay $1,143 per business day for 164 days. The Company recorded $40,500 to debt discount. During the years ended December 31, 2018, the Company repaid $128,050 in principal and amortized $40,500 of debt discount resulting in an unamortized debt discount of $0 and carrying value of $59,450 at December 31, 2018.

 

On April 13, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note in the principal amount of $115,000. This note bears interest at the rate of 7% per annum, due on December 31, 2018. The Company borrowed an additional $25,000 and repaid $60,000 during the year ended December 31, 2018, and the balance outstanding on this note at December 31, 2018, was $80,000.

 

In October 2014, January 2015 and October 2015, the Company entered into three (3) separate 24-month equipment financing agreements (the “Agreements”) with Perkins Industries, LLC (“Perkins”) for equipment in the aggregate amount of $387,750 with an annual interest rate of 15%. The assets financed consisted of self-service electronic kiosks placed in service in the Company’s Southern California region. The Company is obligated to make monthly interest only payments in accordance with the Agreements. The Agreements include a put/call option at the end of year one and the end of year two. Neither of these options were exercised. During 2017 $100,000 was paid down on the notes, and the carrying value as of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 was $287,750.

 

Pursuant to the Agreements Perkins received a warrant to purchase an aggregate of 310,200 shares at an exercise price of $0.35 per share with a contractual term of three (3) years. The warrant was recorded as a debt discount and a warrant liability in the aggregate amount of $3,708 due to the down round provision, pursuant which the exercise price of the warrants was revised to $0.26 at December 31, 2016.

 

In October 2016, the Company and Perkins agreed to extend the termination date of two of the Agreements to October 17, 2017 and January 5, 2018. In consideration of this extension, the Company issued an additional 200,000 warrants with an exercise price of $0.05 per share and a five-year contractual term. The fair value of the warrants was not material and was charged to operations in the accompanying statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2016.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018 the Agreements were purchased by a third party and the due dates were extended to December 31, 2019.

 

F- 12

 

 

On November 19, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note in the principal amount of $124,000 with net proceeds of $112,840. This note matures in 64 weeks. The Company recorded $11,160 to debt discount. During the years ended December 31, 2018, the Company repaid $9,784 in principal and amortized $872 of debt discount resulting in an unamortized debt discount of $10,288 and carrying value of $103,928 at December 31, 2018.

 

On December 12, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note in the principal amount of $112,425 with net proceeds of $64,500. The Company agreed to pay $937 per business day for 120 days. The Company recorded $47,925 to debt discount. During the years ended December 31, 2018, the Company repaid $9,370 in principal and amortized $3,744 of debt discount resulting in an unamortized debt discount of $44,181 and carrying value of $58,874 at December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Notes Payable

 

2014 Stock Purchase Agreement

 

In 2014 and 2015 the Company entered into the 2014 Securities Purchase Agreement (the “2014 SPA”) pursuant to which it issued eight (8) convertible notes in the aggregate face amount of $146,000 due at various dates between August 2015 and March 2016. The principal on these notes is due at the holder’s option in cash or common shares at a conversion rate of $0.30 per share. In connection with these borrowings the Company granted a total of 360,002 warrants with an exercise price of $0.35 per share and a 5 year contractual term. The warrants issued have a down round provision and as a result are classified as a liability in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. Pursuant to the down round provision, the exercise price of the warrants was reduced to $0.22 at December 31, 2016. During 2017 the Company repaid one of the notes in the amount of $50,000. On May 1, 2018, the Company granted 1,000,000 warrants with an exercise price of $0.15 per share and a 5 year contractual term, valued at $2,841, which was recorded as debt discount. As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, outstanding balances of these notes were $166,000.

 

The Company and Cobrador held three of the convertible notes in the aggregate face amount of $45,000, and agreed to extend the repayment date to November 17, 2020. The Company and Cobrador extended the due date to December 31, 2018 on notes totaling $25,000, and the Company agreed to a revised conversion price of $.05 per share and a revised warrant exercise price of $0.07 per share. The change in the value of warrants was not material and was charged to operations during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

2015 Stock Purchase Agreement

 

During the year ended December 31, 2015, the Company issued eleven subordinated convertible notes bearing interest at 9.5% per annum with an aggregate principal balance of $441,000 pursuant to the 2015 Stock Purchase Agreement (the “2015 SPA”).The notes were due in December 2017 and are payable at the noteholder’s option in cash or common shares at a conversion rate of $0.30 per share The conversion rate was later revised to $0.05 due to down round provisions contained in the 2015 SPA, and the due date was extended to November 17, 2020. In connection with these borrowings, the Company issued a warrant to purchase 735,002 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.40 per share and a 5 year contractual term. The exercise price was later revised to $0.22 per share pursuant to the down round provisions in the 2015 SPA. The Company allocated $8,113 of proceeds received to debt discount based on the computed fair value of the convertible notes and warrants issued. During the year ended December 31, 2016, the noteholder converted one note in the face amount of $35,000 into 700,000 shares of common stock. As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the 2015 SPA had a balance of $406,000. The debt discount was fully amortized as of December 31, 2016.

 

2016 Stock Purchase Agreement

 

On June 30, 2016, the Company entered into the 2016 Stock Purchase Agreement (the “2016 SPA”) pursuant to which it issued five convertible notes in the aggregate principal amount of $761,597. The 2016 SPA notes are due in November 2020 and bear interest at 9.5% per annum. The notes are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.17 per share. With this note, the Company satisfied its obligations for: previously issued promissory notes of $549,000, accrued interest of $38,615, lease principal installments of $47,466, previously accrued registration rights penalties of $22,156, due to a former officer of $81,250, and additional interest, expenses, fine and penalties of $23,110. The Company charged additional interest, expenses, fines and penalties $23,110 to operations as amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs during the year ended December 31, 2016.

 

In connection with the 2016 SPA, the Company granted a total of 2,239,900 warrants with an exercise price of $0.30 per share which was later revised to $0.05 per share due to down round provisions, with a 5 year contractual life. The Company allocated $19,242 to debt discount based on the computed fair value of the convertible notes and warrants issued and classified the debt discount is as a warrant liability due to the down round provision in the warrants.

 

As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the 2016 SPA had a carrying value of $761,597 and $756,786, respectively.

 

F- 13

 

 

Other 2016 Financings

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company issued four convertible notes (the “Cobrador 2016 Notes”) in the aggregate principal amount of $115,000. The Cobrador 2016 Notes, related party, have a 2 year term, bear interest at 9.5% per annum, and are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.17 per share. The conversion price was subsequently revised to $0.05 per the down round provisions and the maturity date was extended to September 26, 2021. In connection with the Cobrador 2016 Notes, the Company granted a total of 338,235 warrants with an exercise price of $0.30 per share which was subsequently revised to $0.05 per share due to down round provisions with a 5 year contractual term. The Company allocated $1,994 to debt discount based on the computed fair value of the convertible notes and warrants issued, and classified the debt discount as a warrant liability due to the down round provision in the warrants. As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Cobrador 2016 Notes had a carrying value of $115,000 and $114,500, respectively.

 

During the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company issued three additional convertible notes in the aggregate principal amount of $250,000. The notes have a 2 year term, bear interest at 9.5% per annum and are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.05 per share. In connection with these borrowings, the Company granted warrants to purchase 5,000,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $0.07 per share. The Company allocated $27,585 to debt discount based on the computed fair value of the convertible notes and warrants issued, and the debt discount is classified as a warrant liability due to the down round provision in the warrants. As of December 31, 2018 the carrying value of the note was $250,000. The carrying value of the notes at December 31, 2017 was $238,046.

 

2017 Financings

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company entered into 19 separate convertible notes agreements (the “2017 Convertible Notes)” in the aggregate principal amount of $923,882. The 2017 Convertible Notes each have a 2 year term, bear interest at 9.5%, and are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.05 per share. In connection with the 2017 Convertible Notes, the Company issued a total of 16,537,926 warrants with an exercise price of $0.07 per share with a 5 year term. The Company allocated $59,403 to a debt discount based on the computed fair value of the convertible notes and warrants issued, and classified the debt discount as a warrant liability due to the down round provision in the warrants. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company amortized $31,940 of debt discount resulting in unamortized debt discount of $13,278 and carrying value of $910,608 at December 31, 2018. The carrying value of the notes at December 31, 2017 was $878,668.

 

2018 Financings

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company entered into seventeen separate convertible notes agreements (the “2018 Convertible Notes)” in the aggregate principal amount of $537,500. The 2018 Convertible Notes each have a 2 year term, bear interest at 9.5% if paid in cash, 15% if paid in common stock, and are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.05 per share. In connection with the 2018 Convertible Notes, the Company issued a total of 10,750,000 warrants with an exercise price of $0.07 per share with a 5 year term. The Company allocated $33,384 to a debt discount based on the computed fair value of the convertible notes and warrants issued, and classified the debt discount as a warrant liability due to the down round provision in the warrants. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company amortized $12,803 of debt discount resulting in an unamortized debt discount of $20,581 and carrying value of $516,919 at December 31, 2018.

 

On November 20, 2018, two officers converted $436,500 accrued compensation into two convertible note agreements in the principal amount of $436,500 in exchange . The note has a 2 year term, bear interest at 9.5% if paid in cash, 15% if paid in common stock, and is convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.05 per share.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company entered into three convertible notes agreements in the aggregate principal amount of $240,500 with a net proceed of $214,000. These notes had a 1 year term, and bears interest at 8%-12%. The notes are convertible into a variable number of common shares as defined in the agreement. The embedded conversion features were valued at $59,027, which were recorded as debt discount. In addition, the Company also recorded $26,500 as original debt discount. These notes were in default due to failure to comply with the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, as the result, the Company recorded additional $120,250 penalty in principal as of December 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company amortized $21,382 of debt discount resulting in unamortized debt discount of $64,145 and carrying value of $296,605 at December 31, 2018.

 

F- 14

 

 

Other 2018 Financings

 

On January 26, 2018, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement in the amount of $78,750, with original discount of $3,750, bearing an annual interest rate of 8%. The note is convertible into common stock at a conversion price of $0.07 per share. The Company repaid $78,750 to repay the note in full in August 2018.

 

Scheduled maturities of debt remaining as of December 31, 2018 for each respective fiscal year end are as follows:

 

2019   $ 4,060,183  
2020     1,019,000  
2021     115,000  
      5,073,933  
Less: unamortized debt discount     (152,869 )
    $ 5,041,314  

 

Note 7 – Related Party Debt

 

Mr. Graber, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer through November 30, 2018, is affiliated with Cobrador Multi-Strategy Partners LP (Cobrador), and Cobrador has provided significant financing to the Company. As of December 31, 2018, the Company had $1,067,804 in aggregate face amount due pursuant to Senior Convertible Notes, Convertible Notes and Promissory Note, net of unamortized discount of $284 with $1,067,520 carrying value. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company incurred $89,627 of interest expense for the borrowing from Cobrador.

 

Note 8 – Capital Lease Obligations

 

The Company acquired capital assets under capital lease obligations. Pursuant to the agreement with the lessor, the Company makes quarterly lease payments and will make a guaranteed residual payment at the end of the lease as summarized below. At the end of the lease, the Company will own the equipment.

 

In August 2016, the Company and the lessor agreed to extend the term of the lease until December 31, 2018. As a consideration of the extension, the Company issued warrants to acquire 150,000 shares of common stock. The warrants have an exercise price of $0.30 per share, a term of three years, and were recorded as a debt discount and warrant liability due to the down round provision and as such are marked to market each reporting period.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018 the Company entered into various capital lease agreements. The leases expire at various points through the year ended December 31, 2023.

 

The following schedule provides minimum future rental payments required as of December 31, 2018, under the current portion of capital leases.

  

2019   $ 125,547  
2020     93,467  
2021     49,788  
2022     30,584  
2023     10,252  
Total minimum lease payments     309,638  
Guaranteed residual value     120,668  
      430,306  
Less: Amount represented interest     (59,520 )
Present value of minimum lease payments and guaranteed residual value   $ 370,786  

 

F- 15

 

   

Note 9 – Capital Stock

 

The Company has authorized 600,000,000 shares of common stock.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 1,375,000 shares of common stock with a fair value of $53,547 for services rendered.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 3,186,667 shares of common stock for $278,000 upon exercise of warrants.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company issued 2,550,000 shares of common stock with a fair value of $76,140 for services rendered.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company issued 400,000 shares of common stock upon exercise of cashless warrants.

 

Note 10 – Stock Options and Warrants

 

Warrants

 

At December 31, 2018 the Company had the following warrant securities outstanding:

 

    Warrants     Exercise Price     Expiration
2013 Series A warrants-Senior Convertible Notes     3,000,000     $ 0.05     December 2019
2013 Series B warrants-Senior Convertible Notes *     7,200,000     $ 0.06     December 2019
2014 Series A warrants -Senior Convertible Notes     6,000,000     $ 0.05     December 2019
2014 Series B warrants -Senior Convertible Notes *     7,200,000     $ 0.06     January - December 2019
2014 Warrants for services     656,364     $ 0.22     August - December 2019
2014 Warrants for services     640,000     $ 0.06     January - November 2019
2014 Warrants- 2014 SPA convertible debt     208,334     $ 0.22     August 1, 2019
2014 Warrants - 2014 SPA convertible debt     35,000     $ 0.05     October - November 2019
2015 Warrants - 2014 SPA convertible debt     116,668     $ 0.22     January - March 2020
2015 Warrants - 2015 SPA convertible debt     735,002     $ 0.22     April - November 2020
2015 Warrants for services     127,067     $ 0.22      April - November 2020
2015 Warrants issued in exchange for equipment     318,182     $ 0.22     January 2020
2016 Warrants - 2016 SPA convertible debt     2,239,900     $ 0.05     June 2021
2016 Warrants for services     850,000     $ 0.05     June 2021
2016 Warrants - lease extension     350,000     $ 0.05     August 2019
2016 Warrants - Convertible notes     338,236     $ 0.05     August - September 2021
2016 Warrants for services     200,000     $ 0.07     October 2019
2016 Warrants issued with Convertible Notes     5,000,000     $ 0.07     November - December 2021
2017 Warrants – 2017 financing     15,109,354     $ 0.07     December 2022
2018 Warrants – 2018 financing     9,991,905     $ 0.07     January - November 2023
2018 Warrants for services     2,250,000     $ 0.07     October - December 2023
Total     62,566,102              

 

 * Includes 1.2 million in warrants issued during 2018

 

A summary of all warrants activity for the year ended December 31, 2018 is as follows:

 

    Number of Warrants     Weighted Average Exercise
Price
    Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term  
Balance outstanding at December 31, 2017     50,299,469     $ 0.07       2.71  
Granted     22,400,000     $ 0.05       2.40  
Exercised     (3,186,667 )   $ 0.09       2.40  
Forfeited     -       -       -  

Cancelled

   

(6,000,000

)   $ 0.07       -  
Expired     (946,700 )   $ 0.53       -  
Balance outstanding at December 31, 2018     62,566,102     $ 0.06       2.53  
Exercisable at December 31, 2018     62,566,102     $ 0.06       2.53  

 

F- 16

 

 

The following table provides a summary of changes in the warrant liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

    December 31,
2018
    December 31,
2017
 
Balance at beginning of year   $ 121,860     $ 184,680  
Fair value of warrants issued and recorded as liabilities     33,384       59,043  
Gain on fair value adjustment     (25,889 )     (121,863 )
Balance at end of year   $ 129,355     $ 121,860  

 

The fair value of warrants outstanding at December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 has been determined based on the consideration of the enterprise value of the Company, the limited market of the shares issuable under the agreement and modeling of the Black Scholes method using multiple volatility assumptions. Warrants issued in and prior to 2012 are significantly out of the money and diluted therefore, management has deemed the fair value of these to be minimal.

 

Equity Incentive Plan

 

On July 22, 2011, the Board of Directors of the Company approved the Company’s 2011 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”) and on July 26, 2011, stockholders holding a majority of shares of the Company approved, by written consent, the Plan. and the issuance under the Plan of 5,000,000 shares. On November 16, 2017, the Board of Directors approved an increase of 10,000,000 shares to be made available for issuance under the Plan. Accordingly, the total number of shares of common stock available for issuance under the Plan is 15,000,000 shares. Awards may be granted to employees, officers, directors, consultants, agents, advisors and independent contractors of the Company and its related companies. Such options may be designated at the time of grant as either incentive stock options or nonqualified stock options. Stock-based compensation includes expense charges related to all stock-based awards. Such awards include options, warrants and stock grants. Generally, the Company issues stock options that vest over three years and expire in 5 to 10 years.

 

A summary of all stock option activity for the year ended December 31, 2018 is as follows:

 

    Number of Options     Weighted Average Exercise Price     Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term  
Balance outstanding at December 31, 2017     3,155,100     $ 0.25       2.5  
Granted     -       -       -  
Exercised     -       -       -  
Cancelled or expired     -       -       -  
Balance outstanding at December 31, 2018     3,155,100     $ 0.25       1.5  
Exercisable at December 31, 2018     3,155,100     $ 0.25       1.5  

 

Stock-based compensation related to vested options totaled $256 and $67,913 for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. At December 31, 2018, there was $64 of unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested options. This cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately three months.

 

In 2015, the Company granted 500,000 restricted shares with a three-year vesting period to an officer. During the second quarter of 2017, upon the departure of the officer from the Company, the Board of Directors accelerated his vesting such that all shares were vested on his departure date. During the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, $18,334 and $30,556, respectively, was charged to operations as stock-based compensation costs for the restricted shares granted.

 

F- 17

 

 

Note 11 – Commitments and Contingencies

 

National Hockey League Retail License and Sponsorship Agreement

 

On February 27, 2015, the Company announced a multi-year, Corporate Marketing Letter Agreement (the “NHL Agreement”) with the National Hockey League. The NHL Agreement includes the usage of NHL ® team branded marks on the Company’s Frozen Pond Premium Ice Cream™ for the period commencing March 1, 2015 through June 30, 2020 in retail distributions including mass merchants, specialty shops, convenience stores and in the Company’s specialty kiosks in North America.

 

The Company entered into the NHL Agreement with NHL Enterprises, L.P, NHL Enterprises Canada, L.P. and NHL Interactive Cyber Enterprises, LLC (collectively referred to as the “NHL” and the “Licensors”) and includes a retail license agreement, a corporate sponsorship and a marketing agreement. In connection with the Agreement, the Company shall pay to the NHL a royalty payment of five percent (5%) on net sales as well as fees attributable to national advertising, promotion and corporate marketing and branding events. The Agreement also provides for customary representations, warranties, and indemnification from the parties.

 

The Company has not shipped product to date under the license.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company and NHL agreed to terminate the NHL Agreement forgiving the Company CAD3,450,000 in outstanding obligations under the Sponsorship Agreement, in return the Company agreed to pay the NHL an amount equal to one percent (1%) of the Company’s net sales of certain products as defined under the agreement (the ‘Consideration’). The products include several types of frozen goods that bear the logo or other markings of sports or entertainment brands. This Consideration is to be paid to the NHL quarterly in arrears through the quarter ended June 30, 2026, or until the Company has paid USD$1,600,000 in the aggregate from the date of the agreement to the extent that the Company has revenue related to sports or entertainment brands. The Company recorded USD$2,674,419 in gain on settlement of liabilities.

 

Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. License Agreement

 

In March 2016, the Company entered into a license agreement beginning April 1, 2016 through December 31, 2019 with Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. (“MLB” “Licensor”) for the non-exclusive right to certain proprietary intangible property of the Licensor to be used in connection with the manufacturing, distribution, promotion and advertisement of the Company’s products sold within the U.S., the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. Under the license agreement, the Company is scheduled to pay the following guaranteed payments; $150,000 during 2016, $275,000 during 2017, $100,000 during 2018, and $115,000 during 2019. The Company is obligated to pay the licensor a royalty based on the product sold or advertising sold. The royalty paid will offset all or a portion of the guaranteed payments. The agreement is subject to customary default and termination clauses. The Company paid $322,000 and $101,000 during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and has accrued $0 at December 31, 2018, and $222,000 as of December 31, 2017, and charged to operations $100,000 and $275,000 of guaranteed payments related to the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Operating Lease Obligations

 

As of December 31, 2018, the Company has two operating lease agreements for office and warehouse space, one in southern California and one in Las Vegas. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the lease for the California warehouse was extended for an additional term of one year until February 2019 with a base rent of $2,830 a month. This lease was extended for an additional two months and was terminated on March 31, 2019. The lease for the warehouse in Las Vegas is for a term of 25 months commencing in February 2016 and provides for a base rent of $1,072 with scheduled increases. On March 1, 2018, the Company renewed its lease on the property for a period of twelve months for a base rent of $1,272. In March 2019, the Company renewed the lease for an additional year at the existing monthly base rent of $1,272. The Company also has two vehicle leases for use in product distribution and sales efforts. The vehicle leases expire in June 2021 and require a monthly payment of $1,063. Rent expense amounted to $59,619 and $47,526 during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

The aggregate rental commitments for the office and warehouse leases at December 31, 2018 is:

 

2019   $ 8,204  
Total   $ 8,204  

 

In addition, the Company entered into a short term operating lease during the year ended December 31, 2018 in Southern California. The lease is for a term of three months which ended August 2018 at which point the lease became month to month. The Company is currently paying $845 per month in base rent for this lease.

 

F- 18

 

 

Note 12 - Income Taxes

 

 Loss from operations before provision (benefit) for income taxes is summarized in the following table:

 

   

Years ended

December 31,

 
    2018     2017  
Domestic   $ (301,688 )   $ (2,317,624 )
Foreign     (136,009 )     (865,704 )
    $ (437,697 )   $ (3,183,328 )

 

The income tax provision (benefit) is summarized in the following table:

 

    Years ended December 31,  
    2018     2017  
Current:            
Federal   $ -     $ -  
State     -       -  
Foreign     -       -  
Total Current   $ -     $ -  
                 
Deferred:                
Federal   $ 157,165     $ 189,247  
State     (65,543 )     (192,813 )
Foreign     183,571       (86,536 )
Total Deferred     275,193       (90,102 )
Less increase in allowance     (275,193 )     90,102  
Net Deferred     -       -  
Total income tax provision (benefit)   $ -     $ -  

  

The significant components of the deferred tax assets and liabilities are summarized below:

 

   

Years ended

December 31,

 
    2018     2017  
Deferred tax assets (liabilities):            
Net operating loss carryforwards   $ 2,418,201     $ 2,719,448  
Depreciable and amortizable assets     (31,997 )     (41,913 )
Prepaid expense     -       (167 )
Intangible asset     -       (43,501 )
Stock based compensation     203,866       172,323  
Loss reserve     1,925       1,891  
Accrued compensation     55,463       143,657  
Other     28,433       (654 )
Total     2,675,891       2,951,084  
Less valuation allowance     (2,675,891 )     (2,951,084 )
Net deferred tax assets (liabilities)   $ -     $ -  

  

F- 19

 

   

The Company has approximately $9,977,000 and $6,400,000 in U.S. federal and state net operating loss carryforwards (“NOLs”), respectively, available to reduce future taxable income. Of these carryforwards, $15,808,000 will begin to expire in 2030. Due to the uncertainty as to the Company’s ability to generate sufficient taxable income in the future and utilize the NOLs before they expire, the Company has recorded a valuation allowance to fully offset the NOLs, as well as the total net deferred tax assets.

 

Internal Revenue Code Section 382 (“Section 382”) imposes limitations on the availability of a company’s net operating losses and other corporate tax attributes as certain significant ownership changes occur. As a result of the historical equity instrument issuances by the Company, a Section 382 ownership change may have occurred and a study will be required to determine the date of the ownership change, if any. The amount of the Company’s net operating losses and other tax attributes incurred prior to any ownership change may be limited based on the Company’s value. A full valuation allowance has been established for the Company’s deferred tax assets, including net operating losses and any other corporate tax attributes.

 

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”). The Tax Act makes broad and complex changes to the U.S. tax code, including, but not limited to, (1) reducing the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%; (2) eliminating the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT) and changing how existing AMT credits can be realized; (3) changing rules related to usage and limitation of net operating loss carryforwards created in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017; (4) generally eliminating U.S. federal income taxes on dividends from foreign subsidiaries for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017; and (5) implementing a territorial tax system and imposing a transition toll tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries.

 

On December 22, 2017, the SEC staff issued Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 to address the application of U.S. GAAP in situations when a registrant does not have the necessary information available, prepared, or analyzed (including computations) in reasonable detail to complete the accounting for certain income tax effects of the Tax Reform Act. The Company has recognized the provisional tax impacts related to the revaluation of deferred tax assets and liabilities and included these amounts in its financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2017. As of December 31, 2018, the Company has completed its accounting for the tax effects of the Act.

 

The deferred U.S. income tax expense for 2017 primarily represents a one-time, non-cash expense of approximately $1,189,000 relating to the revaluation of deferred tax assets offset by a reduction of the valuation allowance in an equal amount. This resulted in a net zero effect on the provision for income tax.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company had no unrecognized uncertain tax positions. The Company’s policy is to recognize interest accrued and penalties related to unrecognized uncertain tax positions in tax expense.

 

The Company files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, as well as the states of California, Florida, Illinois and New York. The tax years 2015-2018 generally remain open to examination by the U.S. federal and state taxing authorities. In addition, the 2014 tax year is still open to examination by the state of California.

 

A reconciliation of the income tax provision using the statutory U.S. income tax rate compared with the actual income tax provision reported on the consolidated statements of operations is summarized in the following table:

 

   

Years ended

December 31,

 
    2018     2017  
Statutory United States federal rate     21.00 %     34.00 %
United States federal tax on foreign branch operations     6.53       9.25  
State income tax, net of federal benefit     10.95       6.03  
Other foreign income tax, net of federal benefit     1.98       2.72  
Change in valuation reserves     62.87       (2.83 )
Permanent differences     4.71       0.65  
Goodwill impairment     -       (6.86 )
Tax rate differential between jurisdictions     2.60       (5.64 )
Federal income tax law changes     -       (37.35 )
Other     0.88       0.03  
Foreign net operating loss adjustment     (111.52 )     -  
Effective tax rate benefit (provision)     -%       -%  

   

F- 20

 

 

Note 13 - Subsequent Events

 

On March 3, 2019, Tyler J. Humphrey was appointed to be Interim-Chief Executive Officer and Interim-Chief Financial Officer of the Company. As part of Mr. Humphrey’s compensation, he received a warrant to purchase 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at a strike price of $.07 per share with a five (5) year maturity. He will receive a base salary of $78,000 per year with a discretionary bonus at the direction of the Board of Directors. In connection with Mr. Humphrey’s appointment, Michael T. Carroll resigned as the Company’s President, Chief Executive Officer, and Chief Financial Officer effective February 28, 2019. Additionally, Phillip Jones resigned as a Director of the Company effective March 1, 2019.

 

On March 23, 2019, the Board of Directors approved and appointed Michael P. Flanagan as Chief Executive Officer, President and Member of the Board of Directors of the Company with an effective date of April 1, 2019. Tyler J. Humphrey will continue his role as interim-Chief Financial Officer, exclusively and will no longer serve as Interim Chief Executive Officer.

 

On March 5, the company issued a non-equity linked promissory note for $100,000 to an investor with an annual 10% rate of interest and a one (1) year maturity. This investor also received a warrant for 500,000 shares at a strike price of $.07 per share with a five (5) year maturity.

 

On March 18, 2019, the Company issued a convertible promissory note for $85,250 to an investor with an 8.0% rate of interest and a one (1) year maturity. The Company has the option to pre-pay the note (principal and accrued interest) in cash within the 1st 90 days from issuance at a 25% premium, and a 40% premium 91-180 days from the issuance date. Subsequent to 181 days, the Company shall have no right of prepayment and the holder may convert at a 40% discount to the prevailing market price. The note matures on December 11, 2019.

 

Asset Sale

 

On March 18, 2019, the Company approved of an asset sale of certain assets of the legacy MiniMelts business and operation for $350,000 in cash, which was approved by a majority of stockholders. In 2018, MiniMelts sales accounted for approximately $1,100,000 in revenue. Part of the proceeds from the sale will be used to retire certain lease obligations as well as for general operating purposes.

 

The Company will continue to pursue sales of MLB ice cream under the Major League Baseball license and additionally, leverage its vending assets to pursue new revenue streams and test concepts for new offerings at retail.

 

The Board of Directors has agreed to begin to explore the development of certain products in the cannabis industry with a focus on non-THC Cannabinoids in frozen desserts as well as other complimentary CBD product offerings though vending as well as online sales and direct to retail, under a new brand.

 

On May 30, 2019, the Company issued a series of convertible notes under a $250,000 revolving Senior Secured credit facility to an investor, for working capital purposes. As of the date of this filing, the company had drawn $209,550 under the agreement. The notes carry an interest rate of 9.5% and a two-year term. The notes are convertible into common stock at $0.07 per share and are redeemable after one-year at the company’s option. The notes also contain a 4.99% limitation of ownership on conversion.

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2018, the Company issued 3,841,096 shares of its common stock, including 3,441,096 shares for services valued at $99,294, and 400,000 shares in conversion of $50,000 of convertible notes.  

 

F- 21

 

 

ITEM 9 - CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A - CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the chief executive officer and our chief financial officer and effected by our board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

The Company maintains disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in its Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including the Company’s chief executive officer also acting as chief financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Our evaluation of internal control over financial reporting includes using the 2013 COSO framework, an integrated framework for the evaluation of internal controls issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission, to identify the risks and control objectives related to the evaluation of our control environment.

 

Our chief executive officer, after evaluating the effectiveness of the Company’s “disclosure controls and procedures” (as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act) Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e)) as of the end of the period covered by this annual report, has concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective and that material weaknesses exist in our internal control over financial reporting based on the evaluation of these controls and procedures as required by paragraph (b) of Exchange Act Rules 13a-15 or 15d-15.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Management has identified the following material weakness as of December 31, 2018: insufficient personnel resources within the accounting function to segregate the duties over financial transaction processing and reporting. Because of this material weakness, management concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2018.

 

To remediate our internal control weakness, management intends to implement the following measures:

 

Add sufficient accounting personnel or outside consultants to properly segregate duties and to effect a timely, accurate preparation of the financial statements.

 

Upon the hiring of additional accounting personnel or outside consultants, develop and maintain adequate written accounting policies and procedures.

 

To address the material weaknesses, we performed additional analyses and other post-closing procedures and retained the services of a consultant to ensure that our consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP). Notwithstanding these material weaknesses, management believes that the financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K fairly present, in all material respects, our financial condition, result of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation requirements by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit the Company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There was no change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) during the year ended December 31, 2018 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Inherent Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls

 

The design of any system of control is based upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events. There can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated objectives under all future events, no matter how remote, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may not deteriorate. Because of its inherent limitations, disclosure controls and procedures may not prevent or detect all misstatements. Accordingly, even effective disclosure controls and procedures can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives. In addition, the design of disclosure controls and procedures must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and that management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the benefits of possible controls and procedures relative to their costs. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with policies and procedures may deteriorate.

 

ITEM 9B - OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

  

18

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10 - DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Directors and Executive Officers

 

Name   Age   Position   Director/Officer Since
Michael P. Flanagan   48   Chief Executive Officer, President and Director   April 2019
Tyler J. Humphrey   30   Interim Chief Financial Officer   March 2019
John Edward (Jay) Hentschel   48   Director   June 2017
Patrick White   65   Director   October 2009
Jared Levinthal   46   Director   December 2018

 

The principal occupations for at least the past five years of each of our directors and executive officers are as follows:

 

Michael P. Flanagan was appointed to be Chief Executive Officer, President and member of the Board of Directors of the company on March 23, 2019, with an effective date of April 1, 2019. Mr. Flanagan, has been a consumer products executive since 2009 as Chairman and CEO of The Searchers Group LTD, based in New York, NY. During this time, Mr. Flanagan financed, developed and managed high growth consumer brands in the fashion, cosmetics and jewelry industries. These collective efforts generated new revenue across multiple brands, both in the United States and internationally. Prior to The Searchers Group, Mr. Flanagan was a Vice President with the Seaport group Investment Bank in New York. Mr. Flanagan holds a BA from Tulane University and a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) in Finance from New York University.

 

Tyler J. Humphrey was appointed to be Interim Chief Executive Officer through April 2019 and Interim Chief Financial Officer of the Company on March 3, 2019. In 2011, Mr. Humphrey received a BS is Biomedical Engineering from Tulane University. Mr. Humphrey holds a MSc. in Finance from London Business School. Prior to his studies at London Business School, Mr. Humphrey worked as a Management Consultant at Ernst & Young until 2016 and an Investment Banker at Bailey Southwell in 2017. As part of Mr. Humphrey’s compensation, he received a 500,000 share warrant at a strike price of $.07 per share with a five year maturity.

 

John Edward (Jay) Hentschel  was the Executive Vice President of Dean and Deluca, Inc. where he has worked from October 2016 to January 2018. From May 1991 until September 2016, Mr. Hentschel was a Partner with Accenture, a NYSE-listed global professional services company where he served as managing director of the Retail Industry practice advising large retailers. Currently Mr. Hentschel is not employed. Mr. Hentschel also volunteers on the Retail Advisory Committee for the New York City Investment Fund, has authored numerous articles, and holds an MBA with distinction from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business.

 

Patrick White has been CEO and President of VerifyMe, Inc. since August 2017. Mr.White was Chief Executive Officer and a Board of Director of Document Security Systems, Inc. (“DSS”) from August 2002 to December 2012; serving as its Chairman of the Board of Directors from August 2002 until January 2008. Mr. White then served as a Business Consultant to DSS from 2012 to 2015. DSS is an NYSE American listed company. Mr. White received his Bachelor’s of Science (Accounting) and Masters of Business Administration degrees from Rochester Institute of Technology. We believe Mr. White is qualified to serve on our board of directors based on his extensive corporate management experience, including serving as the chief executive officer of a publicly-held company, and his experience with the organizational challenges involved with becoming and operating as a publicly-held company.

 

Jared Levinthal has served as a Director of the Company since December 2018. Mr. Levinthal is a Principal with Levinthal Wilkins, PLLC in Houston, TX. Mr. Levinthal is a graduate, with Honors, of the University of Texas School of Law. Mr. Levinthal is a graduate of Tulane University with a BA, and is a member of the Texas Bar.

 

Term of Office

 

Directors are elected to hold office until the next annual meeting of stockholders and until their successors are elected and qualified. Annual meetings of the stockholders, for the selection of directors to succeed those whose terms expire, are held at such time each year as designated by the Board of Directors. Officers of the Company are elected by the Board of Directors, which is required to consider that subject at its first meeting after every annual meeting of shareholders. Each officer holds office until his successor is elected and qualified or until his earlier resignation or removal.

 

19

 

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

We do not have any committees of the Board of Directors. We consider a majority of our Board members (consisting of Messrs. Hentschel, Levinthal and White) to be independent directors under NYSE American rules.

 

Corporate Governance

 

We do not have an audit committee, compensation committee or nominating committee. As we grow and evolve as a SEC registrant, our corporate governance structure is expected to be enhanced.

 

ITEM 11 - EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

As of July 10, 2019, the Company has employment agreement with Mr. Flanagan and Mr. Humphrey. Mr. Carroll, Mr. Graber, Mr. Meyers and Mr. Chapman resigned February 28, 2019, November 30, 2018, January 31, 2017 and September 1, 2017, respectively. We do not have key person life insurance on the lives of any of our executive officers.

 

The following table discloses compensation received by our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer and President, BoxScore Brands, Inc., also referred to herein as our “named executive officers,” for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

The following table sets forth information regarding all cash and non-cash compensation earned by or paid to all of the executive officers of the Company who served during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 for services in all capacities to the Company.

 

Name and Principal Position   Year   Salary
($)
    Bonus
($)
    Stock Awards
($)
    Option
Awards
($)
    All Other Compensation ($)     Total
($)
 
Michael P. Flanagan (1)   2018     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Chief Executive Officer   2017     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Tyler J. Humphrey (2)   2018     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Interim Chief Financial Officer   2017     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Michael T. Carroll (3)   2018     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Former Chief Executive Officer   2017     -       -       -       -       -       -  
David Graber (4)   2018     220,000       -       -       -       -       220,000  
Former Chief Executive Officer   2017     242,000       -       -       -       -       242,000  
Raymond J. Meyers (5)   2018     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Former Chief Executive Officer   2017     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Mark A. Chapman (6)   2018     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Former President of U-Vend America, Inc   2017     13,500               30,000       -       -       43,500  

 

1) Mr. Flanagan was appointed CEO effective April 1, 2019 and was granted a monthly salary of $10,000.
   
2) Mr. Humphrey was appointed CFO effective March 3, 2019 and was granted an annual salary of $78,000.
   
3) Resigned effective February 28, 2019. Mr. Carroll was appointed CEO effective December 3, 2018.

 

20

 

 

4) Resigned effective November 30, 2018. Mr. Graber was appointed CEO effective February 1, 2017 and was granted an annual salary of $264,000. During the year ended December 31, 2017, he earned $242,000 under this arrangement, of which $10,000 was paid during the year and $232,000 was earned but unpaid. During the year ended December 31, 2018, he earned $220,000 under this arrangement, of which $100,000 was paid during the year and $120,000 was earned but unpaid. On November 20, 2018, the Company settled $346,000 due to Mr. Graber for unpaid salaries through issuance of convertible note.
   
5) Resigned effective January 31, 2017. Mr. Meyers earned a salary of $60,000 per annum plus a bonus based on revenues for the calendar year of 2016 of which $30,000 was paid during the year and $203,000 was earned but unpaid. On June 30, 2016, the Company settled $270,000 due to Mr. Myers for unpaid salaries and other accounts through issuance of 1,588,236 shares of common stock. On November 20, 2018, the Company settled $90,000 due to Mr. Meyers for unpaid salaries and other accounts through issuance of convertible note.
   
6) Resigned effective September 1, 2017.

 

Employment Agreement

 

The Company and Mr. Flanagan entered into an employment agreement, effective April 1, 2019, for a period of two years, which may be extended by mutual consent. Mr. Flanagan in his capacity as Chief Executive Officer is entitled to 10% of company revenue with a monthly guarantee of $10,000 as a non-recourse draw against sales. Mr. Flanagan will also receive a five (5) year warrant to purchase 3,0000,000 shares of common stock at $.07. The warrant will have a two-year, quarterly vesting schedule. The Employment Agreement may be terminated prior to such date, however, upon Mr. Flanagan’s death, disability, by the Company for Cause (as defined in the Employment Agreement), by Mr. Flanagan for Good Reason (as defined in the Employment Agreement) and voluntary termination by Mr. Flanagan other than for Good Reason upon 30 days’ notice. Upon termination by the Company for any reason other than Cause or by Mr. Flanagan for Good Reason, Mr. Flanagan will receive any accrued but unpaid salary through the date of termination and an amount equal to his salary at the time of termination payable for the remainder of the then-current term. Upon termination by reason of Mr. Flanagan’s death or disability, he will receive any accrued but unpaid salary through the date of termination and an amount equal to his salary at the time of termination payable for 1 year beginning 30 days after the date of termination. Upon termination by the Company for Cause or voluntarily by Mr. Flanagan for other than Good Reason, he will receive only accrued but unpaid salary through the date of termination .

 

Directors Compensation

 

The Company’s non-employee directors do not currently receive cash compensation for their services as directors although they are provided reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in attending Board meetings. In order to attract and retain qualified persons to our Board, in July 2011, the Company granted its non-employee directors stock options through its Equity Incentive Plan. During 2011, each non-employee director received 2,500 stock options at an exercise price of $60.00, vesting equally over a three year period, and with an expiration date of ten years from date of grant. In 2015, the Company granted each of its non-employee directors 500,000 stock options at an exercise price of $0.20, one third of the options vesting immediately and the balance over a two year period, and with an expiration date of five years from the date of grant.

 

Equity Incentive Plan

 

On July 22, 2011, the Board of Directors of the Company approved the Company’s 2011 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”) and on July 26, 2011, stockholders holding a majority of shares of the Company approved, by written consent, the Plan. The Plan provides for the grant of options intended to qualify as “incentive stock options” and “non-statutory stock options” within the meaning of Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, together with the grant of bonus stock and stock appreciation rights, at the discretion of our Board of Directors. Incentive stock options are issuable only to our eligible officers, directors and key employees. Non-statutory stock options are issuable only to our non-employee directors and consultants. Upon stockholder approval of the Plan, a total of 5,000,000 shares of common stock or appreciation rights may be issued under the Plan. The Plan will be administered by our full Board of Directors. Under the Plan, the Board will determine which individuals shall receive options, grants or stock appreciation rights, the time period during which the rights may be exercised, the number of shares of common stock that may be purchased under the rights and the option price. As of December 31, 2018, the Company had 3,155,100 options outstanding under the Plan to employees, directors and outside consultants.

 

On November 22, 2017, stockholders of the Company holding a majority of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock approved, by written consent, an increase in the number of shares reserved under the Plan by 10,000,000 shares. After this increase of 10,000,000 shares, the total number of shares of common stock reserved under the Plan totals 15,000,000 shares. On November 16, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors approved the increase of the 10,000,000 shares reserved under the Plan.

 

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Limitation on Liability and Indemnification of Officers and Directors

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation provides that liability of directors to us for monetary damages is eliminated to the full extent provided by Delaware law. Under Delaware law, a director is not personally liable to us or our stockholders for monetary damages for breach of fiduciary duty as a director except for liability (i) for any breach of the director’s duty of loyalty to us or our stockholders; (ii) for acts or omissions not in good faith or that involve intentional misconduct or a knowing violation of law; (iii) for authorizing the unlawful payment of a dividend or other distribution on our capital stock or the unlawful purchases of our capital stock; (iv) a violation of Delaware law with respect to conflicts of interest by directors; or (v) for any transaction from which the director derived any improper personal benefit.

 

The effect of this provision in our Certificate of Incorporation is to eliminate our rights and our stockholders’ rights (through stockholders’ derivative suits) to recover monetary damages from a director for breach of the fiduciary duty of care as a director (including any breach resulting from negligent or grossly negligent behavior) except in the situations described in clauses (i) through (v) above. This provision does not limit or eliminate our rights or the rights of our security holders to seek non-monetary relief, such as an injunction or rescission, in the event of a breach of a director’s duty of care or any liability for violation of the federal securities laws.

 

ITEM 12 - SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

As of July 10, 2019, there were 36,018,512 shares of common stock outstanding. The following table sets forth certain information regarding the beneficial ownership of the outstanding common shares as of July 10, 2019 by (i) each person who owns beneficially more than 5% of our outstanding common stock; (ii) each of our executive officers and directors; and (iii) all of our executive officers and directors as a group. The shares listed include as to each person any shares that such person has the right to acquire within 60 days from the date hereof. Except as otherwise indicated, each such person has sole investment and voting power with respect to such shares, subject to community property laws where applicable. The address of our executive officers and directors is in care of us at 3675 W. Teco Avenue Suite 8, Las Vegas, Nevada 89118.

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF MANAGEMENT

 

Name of Beneficial Owner   Number of Shares
Beneficially Owned
    Percentage
Owned (%)
 
Tyler J. Humphrey (1)     600,000       1.64 %
Michael Flanaghan (2)     3,000,000       7.69 %
Patrick White (3)     1,278,757       3.50 %
John Edward (Jay) Hentschel     200,000       *  
Jared Levinthal     300,000       *  
All directors and named executive officers as a group (5 individuals)     5,378,757       13.44 %
5% or More Shareholders                
Diane Hope     2,566,346       7.13 %

 

1) Includes 500,000 shares issuable upon exercise of warrants.
   
2) Includes 3,000,000 shares issuable upon exercise of warrants.
   
3) Includes 502,500 shares issuable upon exercise of options.

 

ITEM 13 - CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Director Independence

 

As our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Pink, we are not subject to the rules of any national securities exchange which require that a majority of a listed company’s directors and specified committees of the board of directors meet independence standards prescribed by such rules. However, we consider a majority of our Board members (consisting of Messrs. Meyers, Hentschel, White and Jones) to be independent directors under NYSE American stock exchange rules.

 

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ITEM 14 - PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

Audit Fees

 

Audit fees consist of fees for professional services rendered for audit and review services of the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in the Company’s annual financial statements and review of financial statements included on Form 10-Q, and for services that are normally provided by the auditor in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements. The aggregate fees billed or to be billed for professional services rendered by our principal accountant, Freed Maxick CPAs, P.C. for audit and review services for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 were $106,000 and $105,000, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company was not required to have an audit of its internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Audit Related Fees

 

The aggregate fees billed for other audit related services by our principal accountant, Freed Maxick CPAs, P.C. pertaining to registration statements for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 were approximately $0 and $3,000, respectively.

 

Tax Fees

 

The aggregate fees billed for professional services rendered by our principal accountant, Freed Maxick CPAs, P.C., for preparation of tax returns during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 were $12,000 and $14,200, respectively.

 

All Other Fees

 

The aggregate other fees billed for professional services rendered by our principal accountant, Freed Maxick CPAs, P.C., during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 were $0.

 

We do not have an Audit Committee. Our Board of Directors pre-approves all auditing services and permissible non-audit services provided to us by our independent registered public accounting firm. All fees listed above were pre-approved in accordance with this policy.

 

ITEM 15 - EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

(a) Exhibits

 

3.1   Certificate of Incorporation, dated March 26, 2007 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed on April 9, 2010).
3.2   Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Incorporation, dated October 4, 2010 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 7, 2010).
3.3   Certificate of Amendment of the Certificate Incorporation (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 1, 2018).
3.4   By-laws, as amended (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed on April 9, 2010).
10.1   Internet Media Services, Inc. 2011 Equity Incentive Plan, dated July 26, 2011 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on filed July 27, 2011) .
10.2   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated as of June 18, 2013, between the Company and Cobrador Multi-Strategy Partners, LP (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 19, 2013) .
10.3   Form of Senior Convertible Note issued to Cobrador Multi-Strategy Partners, LP   (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 19, 2013) .
10.4   Form of Warrant to Purchase Common Stock issued to Cobrador Multi-Strategy Partners, LP (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 19, 2013).
10.5   Form of Vending Machine Equipment Lease with Automated Retail Leasing Partners (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 19, 2013).
10.6   Form of Warrant between Automated Retail Leasing Partners, LP and Internet Media Services, Inc. (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on April 15, 2014).
10.7   Promissory Note, dated May 30, 2014, issued to Automated Retail Leasing Partners, LP (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1/A filed on October 1, 2014).
10.8   Equipment Lease Agreement, dated October 21, 2014, between BoxScore Brands, Inc. and Perkin Industries, LLC (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 30, 2014) .
10.9   Warrant to Purchase Common Stock issued to Perkin Industries, LLC, dated October 21, 2014 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 30, 2014).
10.10   Modification to the Series of Cobrador Stock Purchase Agreement, Senior Convertible Notes and Series A Warrants between BoxScore Brands, Inc. and Cobrador Multi-Strategy Partners LP (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 8, 2015).
10.11   NHL/U-Vend Corporate Marketing Letter Agreement, dated February 27, 2015 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on March 17, 2015).
10.12   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement between the Company and each investor, dated on or about August 17, 2015 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on September 4, 2015).

 

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10.13   Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated on or about August 17, 2015 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on September 4, 2015).
10.14   Form of Warrant to Purchase Common Stock, dated on or about August 17, 2015 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on September 4, 2015).
10.15   Securities Purchase Agreement between the Company and each investor, dated June 30, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on July 28, 2016).
10.16   Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated June 30, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on July 28, 2016).
10.17   Form of Warrant to Purchase Common Stock, dated June 30, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on July 28, 2016).
10.18   Debt Conversion Agreement of Raymond Meyers, dated June 30, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on July 28, 2016).
10.19   Debt Conversion Agreement of Paul Neelin, dated June 30, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on July 28, 2016).
10.20   Debt Conversion Agreement of Mark Chapman, dated June 30, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on July 28, 2016).
10.21   Agreement to Amend Leases, dated as of August 8, 2016, between the Company and Automated Retail Leasing Partners, LP (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on August 15, 2016).
10.22   Warrant to Purchase Shares of Common Stock issued to Automated Retail Leasing Partners, LP, dated August 8, 2016 (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on August 15, 2016).
10.23   Master Services Consulting Agreement, dated as of February 1, 2017, between the Company and Raymond Meyers (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 6, 2017).
10.24   Employment Agreement, dated as of February 1, 2017, between the Company and David Graber (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 6, 2017).
10.37   Master Distribution Agreement, dated as of January 26, 2017, between the Company and UVend Group of Companies (incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 6, 2017).
21.1   Subsidiaries of the Registrant (filed herewith).
23.1   Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
31.1   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and15d-14(a) (filed herewith).
32.1   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 (furnished herewith). (1)
101.INS*   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH*   XBRL Schema Document
101.CAL*   XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF*   XBRL Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB*   XBRL Label Definition Document
101.PRE*   XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document

 

(1) In accordance with SEC Release 33-8238, Exhibit 32.1 is being furnished and not deemed filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

  

  BOXSCORE BRANDS, INC.
     
July 11, 2019 By: /s/ Michael P. Flanagan
    Michael P. Flanagan
    Chief Executive Officer and President

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

July 11, 2019 /s/ Michael P. Flanagan
 

Michael P. Flanagan

Chief Executive Officer, President and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)

   

July 11, 2019

/s/ Tyler J. Humphrey
 

Tyler J. Humphrey
Interim Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

  

July 11, 2019 /s/ John Edward (Jay) Hentschel
  John Edward (Jay) Hentschel
Director
   
July 11, 2019 /s/ Patrick White
  Patrick White
Director
   
July 11, 2019 /s/ Jared Levinthal
  Jared Levinthal
Director

  

 

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